Word of the Week (WOW) – Ubiquitous

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practise with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are up to you.

I’m up to the letter U this week so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with V

So, here is my WOW for this week:

ubiquitous

 Word: 

Ubiquitous

Pronunciation

u·biq·ui·tous  [juːˈbɪkwɪtəs]

Audio Link: 

Ubiquitous

Part of Speech: 

Adjective

Related Forms:

Adverb: ubiquitously 

Noun: ubiquitousness; ubiquity

 Meaning:

Existing or being everywhere, especially at the same time; omnipresent: ubiquitous fog

A foggy day in San Francisco. Author Daniel Ramirez, Honolulu, USA
A foggy day in San Francisco. Author Daniel Ramirez, Honolulu, USA

Synonyms:

omnipresent, ever present, pervasive, all-over, everywhere, universal, common or garden (chiefly British) commonplace, everyday, familiar, frequent, ordinary, quotidian, routine, usual , widespread, generalised, scattered

Antonyms: 

extraordinary, infrequent, rare, seldom, uncommon, unfamiliar, unusual

Word Origin:

“Turning up everywhere,” 1837, from  ubiquity + ous. The earlier word was ubiquitary (1580s), from Modern Latin uubiquitarious from ubique

Use in a Sentence:

1. The police presence was ubiquitous in Edinburgh during the protests at the start of the G8 summit.

800px-EdinburghProtests3
Edinburgh protests at the start of the G8 summit. Author: Sam Fentress. Commons

2. (Adverb use) Denim is used ubiquitously in the clothes industry:

Hand Sanding. Author: Fahed Faisal. Commons
Hand Sanding. Author: Fahed Faisal. Commons

3. McDonald’s has a ubiquitous presence in the world.

800px-Mcd-times_square
McDonalds in Times Square. Uploaded by Hecki2. Public Domain

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Tenacious

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practise with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter T this week so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with U

So, here is my WOW for this week:

tenacious

 Word: 

Tenacious

Pronunciation

te•na•cious [tuhney-shuh s]

Audio Link: tenacious  (Not much difference between the UK and US pronunciation with this word)

Part of Speech: 

Adjective

Related Forms:

Adverb: te·na·cious·ly

Noun: te·na·cious·ness

Noun: tenacity

Noun: tenacity: the quality of being tenacious

 Meaning:

1. Holding fast, or keeping a firm hold, often followed by of, e.g. a tenacious grip on my arm

2. Highly retentive, e.g. a tenacious memory.

3. Persistent, stubborn, or obstinate.

4.  Adhesive or sticky; viscous or glutinous.

5. Holding together; cohesive; not easily pulled apart; tough.

Synonyms:

1. Stubborn, dogged, determined, persistent, sure, firm, adamant, staunch, resolute, inflexible, strong-willed, steadfast, unyielding, obstinate, intransigent, immovable, unswerving, obdurate, stiff-necked, pertinacious, tight, forceful, unshakable

2. Synonyms for adhesive meaning (4): clinging, sticky, glutinous, gluey, mucilaginous (e.g. tenacious catarrh in the nasal passage and lungs).

Antonyms:  

Wavering, changeable, vacillating, yielding, flexible, irresolute

Word Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin tenaxtenac- (from tenere ‘to hold’) + ious

Use in a Sentence:

1. It was sad that a man with such a tenacious memory as Albert should succumb to acute dementia so early in life:

A man diagnosed as suffering fromacute dimentia. Credit: Welcome Trust. Creative Commons
A man diagnosed as suffering from acute dementia. Credit: Welcome Trust. Creative Commons

2. (Adverb use) King Alfred’s men fought tenaciously against the Danes to save their kingdom:

shutterstock_145907300

3. (Noun use) David Beckham’s tenaciousness and commitment to soccer makes him one of the truly great players:

1999_FA_Cup_Final_Beckham_corner
1999 FA Cup Final Bechham corner. Author: Michael Cairns. Creative Commons

4. A ladybird goes after its garden prey in a tenacious manner:

shutterstock_106325636

If you’d like to see more interesting words, visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Somnolent

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practise with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter S this week, so I’ll be looking for a word beginning with  T next week.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

somnolent

 Word: 

Somnolent

Pronunciation:  

som·no·lent  [som-nuh-luh nt]

Audio:  HERE

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Noun: somnolence; somnolency

Adverb: somnolently

 Meaning:

1. Drowsy; sleepy (e.g a somnolent river, or a somnolent person)

2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep or sedation; soporific (e.g. a somnolent lesson)

shutterstock_41671063

Synonyms:

sleepy, drowsy, tired, languid, languorous, heavy-eyed, dozy, noddding, half-asleep, asleep on one’s feet, yawning, lethargic, sluggish,  inactive, enervated, torpid, comatose, slumberous (or slumbrous) soporific.  Informal: snoozy, dopey, yawny

Antonyms:

alert, awake,conscious, wakeful, wide-eyed

Word Origin:

1425-75; late Middle English sompnolent < Old French < Latin somnolentus, derivative of somnus (sleep).

Use in a Sentence:

1. After feeding him, Katherine laid her somnolent baby in his cradle:

800px-Sleeping_baby_with_arm_extended
Sleeeping male baby with arm extended. Author: PinkStock Photos, D. Sharon Pruitt

2. Once we’d crossed to the island, we passed through a number of somnolent villages:

Shanklin old village, isle of Wight, UK. Author: Christophe Finot. Creative Commons
Shanklin old village, isle of Wight, UK. Author: Christophe Finot. Creative Commons

3. (Noun  use) The warmth of the summer’s afternoon, combined with the good food and wine, induced a degree of somnolence in us:

picnic-787117_640
Picnic. Courtesy of Pixabay

4. (Adverb use) The waves lapped somnolently against the shore as we took our evening stroll.

Beach sunset in Cuba. Author: Aaron Escobar. Creative Commons
Beach sunset in Cuba. Author: Aaron Escobar. Creative Commons

If you’d like to see more interesting words, visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Redolent

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter R this week. I started off by just choosing a word at random (perspicacious). Since then, I’ve been working through the alphabet, so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with next week.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

redolent

 Word: 

Redolent

Pronunciation:

red·o·lent  (rɛdəʊlənt)

Audio link: Click here

Part of Speech:

Adjective

[Noun: red·o·lence, red·o·len·cy.  Adverb: red·o·lent·ly]

 Meaning:

1.Having a pleasant smell; fragrant e.g. a  deep, rich, redolent wine 

399px-Syrah_from_Sicily
Syrah wine from Sicily. Pixabay

2. Odorous or smelling (usually followed by of) e.g. a room, redolent of furniture polish

3. Suggestive; reminiscent (usually followed by of or with) e.g. a portrait redolent of the nineteenth century 

800px-John_Constable_The_Hay_Wain
The Hay Wain by John Constable. 1821. Now in the National Gallery. Public Domain

Synonyms:

1. odorous, aromatic, odoriferous, ambrosial, aromatic, perfumed, fragrant, savoury (savory) scented, sweet, pleasant -smelling

2. (serving to bring to mind): evocative, remindful, reminiscent, resonant

Antonyms:

fetid, foul, malodorous, noisome, putrid, rancid, rank, reek, reeking, skunky, smelly, stenchful, stinking, stinky, strong

Word Origin

C14: from Latin redolens smelling (of), from redolēre to give off an odour, from red- re + olēre to smell

Use in a Sentence:

1. The chapter Margaret was reading was a sad one, redolent of regret and lost causes.

shutterstock_95148265

2. The forest path was redolent with the scent of pine needles.

Pine woods at Holkham Meals Reach. geograh.org.uk Attribution: Zorba the Greek. Wikimedia Commons
Pine woods at Holkham Meals Reach. geograh.org.uk Attribution: Zorba the Greek. Wikimedia Commons

3. (Noun use): The farmhouse kitchen was filled with the redolence of freshly baked bread.

Reconstruction_of_a_farmhouse_kitchen_in_the_Wensleydale_Creamery_Visitor_Centre_-_geograph.org.uk_-_348302 (1)
Farmhouse kitchen at Wensleydale Creamery. geog.org.uk. Attribtion: Ken Walton

If you’d like to see more interesting words, visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Quagmire

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practise with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter Q this week. I started off by just choosing a word at random (perspicacious). Since then, I’ve been working through the alphabet, so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with  next week.

*Note to exiledprospero, who kindly suggested a good word for me to do when I reached Q:

I was going to do Qixotic this week, Prospero, as you kindly suggested, but I discovered that Heena, who runs this challenge, had beaten me to it.  So, if you’d like to see what Heena has to say about that excellent word, follow the link in her name above.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

quagmireWord: Quagmire

Pronunciation:  [kwag-mahyuh r, kwog-]  (ˈkwæɡˌmaɪə; ˈkwɒɡ-)

Audio link to British and U.S. pronunciation here

Part of Speech:  Noun

Adjective:  Quagmiry (quag·mir·y)

 Meaning:

1. A soft wet area of land that gives way underfoot.

Quagmire: The Snicks near Shouldham, Norfolk, England. geograph.org.uk. Attribution: Keith Evans. Wikimedia Commons,
Quagmire: The Snicks near Shouldham, Norfolk, England. geograph.org.uk. Attribution: Keith Evans. Wikimedia Commons,

2. A difficult  or precarious situation; a predicament.

shutterstock_232221142

3. Anything soft or flabby.

Synonyms:

predicament, difficulty, quandary, pass, dilemma, pinch, plight, muddle, impasse, entanglement, imbroglio. Informal usage: fix, jam, scrape, pickle, rabbit-hole, rattrap. sticky wicket.

Word Origin and History (Dictionary.com)

1570s, “bog, marsh,” from obsolete quaq “bog, marsh” + mire. Early spellings include quamyre (1550s), quabmire (1590s), quadmire (1600). The extended sense of “difficult situation, inescapable bad position” is recorded by 1766, but this seems to have been not in common use in much before the 19th century.

Use in a Sentence:

1. Martin had no problems on his bike ride until he reached the track through the woods where the slush and rain had turned it into a quagmire.

Quagmire_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1425200
Quagmire in Stapleford Woods. Wikimedia Commons. Geograph.org.uk. Attribution: Richard Croft

2. Continuous rain for days on end had turned the former battlefield into a quagmire.

The British Army on the Western Front 1914-18. Muddy tracks through the former battlefield. Commons. Photographer: David McLellan, Second Lieutenant
The British Army on the Western Front 1914-18. Muddy tracks through the former battlefield. Commons. Photographer: David McLellan, Second Lieutenant

3. The dilemma sucked Angela deeper and deeper into a quagmire of indecision.

shutterstock_2156487254. The family was enguilfed in a legal quagmire and was concerned that they may not be able to afford lawyer’s hefty fees.

*

If you’d like to see more interesting words, visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Popinjay

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practice with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by not necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter P this week. I started off by just choosing a word at random (perspicacious). Since then, I’ve been working through the alphabet, so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with next week

So, here is my WOW for this week:

popinjay

Word: Popinjay

Pronunciation:   Pop·in·jay  [pop-in-jey]  (popinˌdzei)

Audio Link: popinjay

Part of Speech:  Noun

Adjective: Popinjay (when used to describe colours, e.g. popinjay blue; popinjay green).

 Meaning:

1.  A conceited, vain,  foppish, or excessively talkative person.

shutterstock_217997104

2.  British Dialect. a woodpecker, especially the green woodpecker.

Green Woodpecker. Wikimedia Commons. Source: geograph.org.uk. Author: Christine Matthews.
Green Woodpecker. Wikimedia Commons. Source: geograph.org.uk.
Author: Christine Matthews.

3.  An archaic word for parrot.

shutterstock_102953678

4. Archaic: the figure of a parrot usually fixed on a pole and used as a target in archery and gun shooting.

Tir_à_l'arc_au_papegai
Two men shooting a popinjay (papegai). Public Domain. Anonymous.

Here is a good summary of the word’s meaning that I found at Dictionary Definition: Vocabulary.com

A popinjay is a person who is both talkative and cocky, who struts around chattering like a parrot. Fittingly, it’s also an old-fashioned word meaning parrot, and the name of a sport also known as pole archery, in which players shoot at wooden bird shapes with either rifles or crossbows. The origin of popinjay is unknown, but one guess is that its roots are imitative, meant to sound like the cry of a bird.

Synonyms:

fop, swell, buck, peacock, dandy, jackanapes, coxcomb, egoist, egotist, beau, blade, clothes-horse, dude, macaroni, Beau Brummel, blabbermouth, chatterbox.

Word Origin:

1275-1325; Middle English papejay, popingay, papinjai < Middle French papegai, papingay parrot < Spanish papagayo < Arabic babaghā

Use in a Sentence:

1.  The party host was a strutting, supercilious dandy; a real popinjay.

2. Maria sighed when she realised that her blind date was another Beau Brummel, who cared too much about his own appearance to appreciate the efforts she had made with hers.

Beau_Brummel_Gillette_ad
Beau Brummel Gillette Advert. Wikimedia Commons

3. The men congregated around the pole, some taking aim at the wooden popinjay fixed securely to the top.

Jeu du papegay. Anonymous. Public Domain
Jeu du papegay. Anonymous. Public Domain

4. (Adjective use). Carol’s new dress was a bright, popinjay blue.

shutterstock_266905433

4.  Her constant bragging gave her the air of being an irritating popinjay

*

If you’d like to see more interesting words, visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Obeisance

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practise with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter O this week. I started off by just choosing a word at random (perspicacious). Since then, I’ve been working through the alphabet, so I’ll be looking for a word beginning with the letter next week.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

obeisance

Word: Obeisance

Pronunciation:  o·bei·sance [oh-bey-suh ns] [ə(ʊ)ˈbeɪs(ə)ns]

Audio:  Obeisance

Part of Speech:  Noun

Plural noun: obeisances

Adjective: obeisant

Adverb: obeisantly

 Meaning:

1.  a movement of the body expressing deep respect or deferential courtesy, as before a superior; a bow, curtsy, or other similar gesture.

shutterstock_62977630

2. deference, homage or respect for someone or something

382px-A_devotee_at_Gurudwara_Harmandir_Sahib,_Punjab
A devotee at Gurdwara Harmandir Sahib, Punjab, india. Athor: Koshy Koshy, from New Delhi, Indi Wikimedia Commons

Synonyms:

homage, respect, tribute, loyalty, devotion, fidelity, reverence, deference, faithfulness, fealty,  allegiance, bow, salaam, salutation, kowtow, genuflection, bob, bending of the knee, curtsy or curtsey, veneration, submission

Antonyms: 

censure, condemnation, disdain, scorn, dishonour, disloyalty, disregard, disrespect, treachery, bad manners, disobedience

Word Origin

1325-75; Middle English obeisaunce < Middle French obeissance, derivative of Old French obeissant, present participle of obeir to obey.

Use in a Sentence:

1. Sir Walter Raleigh displayed obeisance to Queen Elizabeth I by throwing his cloak over a puddle along her route.

736px-Sir_Walter_Raleigh_jetant_son_manteau_sous_les_pieds_de_la_reine_Elizabeth
Raleigh and his Cloak cartoon by Thackery,1848 for the first edition of ‘The Book of Snobs’. Public Domain

2.  Obeisance was not one of the rude secretary’s personal qualities.

shutterstock_198105260

3. (Adverb use) The serving girl bowed her head obeisantly as she proffered the wine goblet to the king.

shutterstock_269005037

4. (Plural use) The noblemen filed into the large hall to make their obeisances to the new king.

*

If you’d like to see more interesting words, visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Nefarious

wow Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practice with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are not necessary, but it’s up to you.

Next week I’ll be looking for a word beginning with o.

Here is my WOW for this week: nefarious

 Word: Nefarious

Pronunciation:  ne·far·i·ous  [ni-fair-ee-uh s] (nə-fâr′ē-əs)

Audio link for pronunciation http://www.thefreedictionary.com/nefarious

Part of Speech: Adjective Adverb: nefariously Noun: nefariousness  

Meaning: extremely wicked or villainous; iniquitous stealing-294489_640  Synonyms:

flagitious, heinous, infamous, vile, atrocious, execrable, sinful, base, shameful, depraved, unethical, impious

Antonyms: good, honest, just, noble, upright, honourable, decent, ethical, virtuous

Word Origin: C 17 from Latin nefarious from nefās unlawful deed, from not + fās divine law

Use in a Sentence:

1. Martha scrutinised her husband’s new colleague, convinced there was something nefarious about him.

2. Police had been alerted to the fact that the nefarious casino boss had been recently released from prison and had returned to the town.

shutterstock_122170489

3. It is a great pity that such a wonderful tool as the Internet can be used for so many nefarious purposes.

shutterstock_261571940

If you’d like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Mellifluous

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practice with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

Next week, I’ll be looking for a word beginning with the letter n.

Here is my WOW for this week:

mellifluous

 Word:  mellifluous

Pronunciation:  mel·lif·lu·ous  [muhlif-loo-uh s]  (mə-lĭf′lo͞o-əs)

Part of Speech: Adjective

Adverb: mellifluously; Noun: melliflousness

 Meaning

1. (of sounds or utterances) having a smooth, flowing sound (e.g. a mellifluous voice)

Singing to the Reverend by Edmund Leighton. 1853-1922. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain
Singing to the Reverend by Edmund Leighton. 1853-1922. Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

2.  sweetened with or as if with honey

Synonyms:

sweet, sweet-sounding, sweet-toned, dulcet, honeyed, mellow, soft, smooth, silvery, liquid, soothing, rich, euphonious, harmonious, tuneful, musical,  lyrical, lyric, melodic, melodious, mellifluent

Antonyms:

unlyrical, cacophanous

Word Origin:

C15: from Late Latin mellifluus flowing with honey, from Latin mel honey + fluere to flow

Use in a Sentence:

1. I eventually nodded off to sleep, lulled by the mellifluous tones of the nightingale.

250px-Nachtigall_(Luscinia_megarhynchos)-2
Nightingale (Luscina megarhynchos) in Berlin, Germany. Wikimedia Commons, Author: Nadingall, J Dietrich

2. Gerald was enraptured by the mellifluous sounds of the string instruments.

orchestra-33887_640
Orchestra. Image courtesy of Pixabay

3. The little stream that flowed beneath the bridge made beautifully mellifluous gurgling sounds.

Small_Stream,Tregwynt_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1445634 (1)
Small Stream, Tregwynt, Wales. Wikimedia Commons. From geograph.org.uk

4. James struggled to tear his eyes from the mellifluous movement of the model’s hips.

shutterstock_43122976

4. (Adverb) I am delighted to meet you, Miss Peacock,’ the bank manager intoned mellifluously.

shutterstock_131782454

If you’d like to view more interesting word, the visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Leviathan

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link). It’s a nice post to do and will give you some practise with a dictionary, of which there are several online. Illustrations are by no means necessary, but it’s up to you.

I’m up to the letter L this week. I started off by just choosing a word at random (perspicacious). Since then, I’ve been working through the alphabet, so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with M next week.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

leviathan

 Word: Leviathan

Pronunciation:  le·vi·a·than  [li-vahyuh-thuhn;  luh- veye -uh-thuhn]

Part of Speech:  noun

Adjective: leviathan – meaning very large; gargantuan

 Meaning:

1. (often initial capital letter: LeviathanBible. a sea monster.

The Destruction of Leviathan.
The Destruction of Leviathan. An engraving from 1865 by Gustave Doré
Lev-Beh-Ziz
Levianthan sea monster with Behemoth the land monster and Ziz the air monster. Public domain via Wikimedia.

2. any huge marine animal, as the whale.

Anim1754_-_Flickr_-_NOAA_Photo_Library
Blue whales grow up to 30 meters in length and weigh up to 190 tonnes/160tons. They are the largest existing animal and the heaviest that has ever lived. Blue whale. Image from Wikimedia Commons. Author: NOAA Photo Library.
Giant_Manta_AdF
These giant manta rays can have a wingspan of uo to 7 meters. They swim in the strong currents, slowly flapping their wings with amazing elegance. Author> Arturu de Frias Marques at Raja Ampat, West Papu, Indonesia.

3. anything of immense size and power, as a huge, oceangoing ship.

4. initial capital letter, italics: Leviathan) a philosophical work (1651) by ThomasHobbes dealing with the political organisation of society.

Leviathan_by_Thomas_Hobbes
Frontpiece of “Levianthan by Thomas Hobbes” – author unknown. 1661

Synonyms:

behemoth, blockbuster, colossus, colossal, dinosaur, dreadnaught, jumbo, elephant, elephantine, Goliath, jumbo, giant, mammoth, mastodon, monster, monstrous, titan, whale, whopper, whopping, gargantuan, astronomical, immense, supersize

Antonyms: 

diminutive, dwarf, half-pint, midget, mite, peewee, pygmy/pigmy, runt, shrimp, infinitesimal, Lilliputian, micro, miniscule, tiny, teeny, microscopic

Word Origin:

1350-1400; Middle English levyathan < Late Latin leviathan < Hebrew: liwyāthān

Use in a Sentence:

1. It can be a great challenge to drive a wheeled leviathan in rush-hour traffic.

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2. The tree was a leviathan among redwoods.

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Giant redwood tree ‘Sherman’ in the Sequoia National Park, California, USA Source: de.wikipedia uploaded by de: Benutzer: Pc fish

3. The man in front of us was a leviathan! He took up several seats at the theatre.

4. (Adjective use) The Titanic was a leviathan ship by the standards of the time.

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