Weekly Word – Disingenuous

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter D:

Meaning:

(Of a person or their behaviour):

Not totally honest, frank or sincere;  not speaking the complete truth.

Pretending to know less about something than one actually does; falsely or hypocritically ingenuous (i.e. honest, sincere and trusting, sometimes in a way that seems childlike and naive).

 Pronunciation:

dis-in-jen-yoo-uh s

Audio Link:

disingenuous

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

disingenuously (adverb)

disingenuousness  (noun)

Synonyms:

dishonest, deceitful, underhand, duplicitous, double-dealing, two-faced, dissembling, insincere, false, lying, untruthful, mendacious, artful, cunning, scheming, double-faced

Antonyms:

ingenuous, frank, artless, candid, open, sincere, trustworthy, upright, honourable

Word Origin

First recorded in 1645–55 dis + ingenuous

Use the Word in a Sentence (or two):

1. Having been hurt too many times by Enrico’s philandering ways, Maria had no intention of being influenced by his disingenuous compliments and attempts to win her back. She would simply smile sweetly and send him on his way.

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2. The disingenuousness of the newest recruit to their company was evident to several of the board members but, unfortunately, they had been outvoted.

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3. ‘Our new business will use only eco-friendly technology and provide employment for many of the local workforce…’ The three colleagues listened to the disingenuously delivered spiel before standing and leaving the guy to clear up his gear and see himself out.

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If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Capricious

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter C:

capricious

Meaning:

Given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behaviour

Pronunciation:

kuh·pri·shuhs

Audio Link:

Capricious

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

Capriciously (adverb)

Capriciousness (noun)

Word Origin: 

Early 17th century from the French capricieux, from the Italian capriccioso  (meaning free and impulsive – used chiefly as a direction in music)

Synonyms:

fickle, unpredictable, inconstant, changeable, variable, unstable, mercurial, volatile, erratic, irregular, inconsistent, vacillating, haphazard

Antonyms:

stable, consistent, constant

Use the Word in a Sentence:

1.  The old pharaoh had been a cruel and capricious ruler and few people would mourn his passing.pharaoh-1181518_1920

 

2. The weather changed capriciously during the week and completely ruined our hiking holiday.

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4. The capriciousness of Prince John has been portrayed in every Robin Hood film I’ve ever seen.

King_John_from_De_Rege_Johanne
King John of England, 1167-1216. Illuminated manuscript, De Rege Johanne, 1300-1400. MS Cott. Claud DII, folio 116, British Library. Scanned from the book The National Portrait Gallery History of the Kings and Queens of England by David. Public Domain

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If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock