Weekly Word – Disingenuous

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter D:

Meaning:

(Of a person or their behaviour):

Not totally honest, frank or sincere;  not speaking the complete truth.

Pretending to know less about something than one actually does; falsely or hypocritically ingenuous (i.e. honest, sincere and trusting, sometimes in a way that seems childlike and naive).

 Pronunciation:

dis-in-jen-yoo-uh s

Audio Link:

disingenuous

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

disingenuously (adverb)

disingenuousness  (noun)

Synonyms:

dishonest, deceitful, underhand, duplicitous, double-dealing, two-faced, dissembling, insincere, false, lying, untruthful, mendacious, artful, cunning, scheming, double-faced

Antonyms:

ingenuous, frank, artless, candid, open, sincere, trustworthy, upright, honourable

Word Origin

First recorded in 1645–55 dis + ingenuous

Use the Word in a Sentence (or two):

1. Having been hurt too many times by Enrico’s philandering ways, Maria had no intention of being influenced by his disingenuous compliments and attempts to win her back. She would simply smile sweetly and send him on his way.

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2. The disingenuousness of the newest recruit to their company was evident to several of the board members but, unfortunately, they had been outvoted.

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3. ‘Our new business will use only eco-friendly technology and provide employment for many of the local workforce…’ The three colleagues listened to the disingenuously delivered spiel before standing and leaving the guy to clear up his gear and see himself out.

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If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

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Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Capricious

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter C:

capricious

Meaning:

Given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behaviour

Pronunciation:

kuh·pri·shuhs

Audio Link:

Capricious

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

Capriciously (adverb)

Capriciousness (noun)

Word Origin: 

Early 17th century from the French capricieux, from the Italian capriccioso  (meaning free and impulsive – used chiefly as a direction in music)

Synonyms:

fickle, unpredictable, inconstant, changeable, variable, unstable, mercurial, volatile, erratic, irregular, inconsistent, vacillating, haphazard

Antonyms:

stable, consistent, constant

Use the Word in a Sentence:

1.  The old pharaoh had been a cruel and capricious ruler and few people would mourn his passing.pharaoh-1181518_1920

 

2. The weather changed capriciously during the week and completely ruined our hiking holiday.

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4. The capriciousness of Prince John has been portrayed in every Robin Hood film I’ve ever seen.

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King John of England, 1167-1216. Illuminated manuscript, De Rege Johanne, 1300-1400. MS Cott. Claud DII, folio 116, British Library. Scanned from the book The National Portrait Gallery History of the Kings and Queens of England by David. Public Domain

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If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Wednesday Word – Boorish

Wednesday Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter B:

boorish

Meaning:

Rough and bad-mannered. ‘Boorish behaviour’

Of or like a boor; coarse; crude; insensitive.

Pronunciation:

Boor-ish   (bu̇r-ish)

Audio link:

Boorish

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

Boor (noun)

boor·ish·ness (noun)
boor·ish·ly (adverb)

Word Origin:

First recorded in 1555–65; boor + ish

Boorish, originally referring to behavior characteristic of an unlettered rustic or peasant. Now it implies a coarse and blatant lack of sensitivity to the feelings or values of others:

Synonyms:

barbaric; churlish; coarse; impolite; rude; vulgar; loutish; uncultured; ungracious; rough; swinish; discourteous; country bumpkin; ungentlemanly

Antonyms:

delicate; gentle; kind; mannerly; pleasant; refined; polite; charming.

Use the Word in a Sentence:  

1.  Mrs Meredith threw a look of despair at her daughter, whose new boyfriend could only be described as a complete boor.

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2. Lord Harcourt tolerated the peasants when they came to help with the harvest on his estate, or to dig ponds, and ditches, but he disliked their boorishness intensely.

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Feiernde Bauern (Celebrating Peasants), artist unknown, 18th or 19th century

3. The bus driver looked squarely at the three rowdy football supporters as they got on his bus, cans of beer in hand, and said, ‘We don’t allow drinking or other boorish behaviour on our buses, lads, so I suggest you put your drinks away and quieten down before taking your seats’.

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Note:

From all the examples of boorish I found, it appears that it and its related forms apply mostly to males. In fact, I found something to that effect on one website I was looking at, then couldn’t find it next time I looked. Duh…

I can only assume the reason for the word’s application to males is due (in part, at least) to it’s origin in connection with country bumpkins, peasants and so on, who worked on the land. I’m pretty sure that the behaviour of some women could also be described as boorish.

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

Remember…

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Image  from Shutterstock

Wednesday Word – Acquiesce

It’s a long time since I wrote a post for this topic – which I’m about to rectify.  I really enjoyed doing my Word of the Week posts, and although I was half-way through the alphabet when I stopped posting a couple of years ago (due to restraints on my time while writing my novels) I intend to start again and work my way through the alphabet. My daughter, Louise, is joining me in this and will be posting on her website:

An Enchanted Place.

As we both hope to post every Wednesday the title has changed to Wednesday Word.

This week’s word begins with the letter A:

acquiesce

Meaning:

To accept or agree to something, often unwillingly but without complaint.

Pronunciation:

ak-wee-es  [æk.wiˈes]

Audio link:

Acquiesce

Part of Speech:

Transitive Verb

Related Forms:

Acquiescence (noun)

Acquiescent (adjective)

Acquiescing (present participle)

Word Origin:

In English around 1610-20 > from the Middle French acquiescer > from the Latin acquiescere [ad + quiescere (to be quiet), from quies (rest) ]

Synonyms:

Accede, accept, agree, allow, approve, assent, concur, bow to, comply, conform, consent, give in, go along with, submit, yield, resort to, surrender, capitulate

Antonyms:

deny, differ, oppose, refuse, reject, decline, disallow

Use the Word in a Sentence:

~ I really didn’t want to spend the day shopping with my wife but her constant nagging caused me to acquiesce.

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~ Sister Julia bowed her head in acquiescence of Mother Superior’s orders and hurried away to do her bidding.

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~ Lord Henry Mortimer was relieved to find the peasants more acquiescent to his intentions for their village than he’d expected.

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To finish off, here’s a very short video of perhaps the most well-known use of the word ACQUIESCE in relatively recent years. It’s from Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of he Black Pearl. In this clip the words are spoken by Captain Barbossa to Elizabeth Swan. Later on in the film, Elizabeth throws the same words back at him. The YouTube video is from Английские слова

If anyone would like to join in with this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can choose a word of your own and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern of post to ours to talk about your word.

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