Word of Week (WOW) – Incorrigible

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m looking at the letter I this week: 

incorrigible

Word

Incorrigible

Pronunciation:

in·cor·ri·gi·ble   (ĭn-kôr′ĭ-jə-bəl)

Audio:

incorrigible

Part of Speech

Adjective

Related Forms:

Noun:  incorrigibility; incorrigibleness

Adverb. incorrigibly

Meaning:

  1. Bad beyond correction or reform; not corrigible (corrigible meaning capable of being corrected or reformed)

2.  Impervious to constraints or punishment; wilful; unruly; uncontrollable:

(e.g. William’s teachers said he was always fighting in the playground and was totally incorrigible.):

Image courtesy of Pixabay
Image courtesy of Pixabay

3.  firmly fixed; not easily changed

4.  not easily swayed or influenced

5.  (Noun) a person who is incorrigible

Word Origin:

Middle English: 1300-1350, from the Latin incorrigibilis – from in (not) corrigibilis

Synonyms:

incurable, irrecoverable, irredeemable, irreformable, unredeemable, depraved, hopeless, delinquent, unruly, unalterable, inveterate, disobedient, unreformed, hardened, intractable

Antonyms:

curable, reclaimable, recoverable, redeemable, reformable, remediable, retrievable, savable (or saveable) corrigible

Use in a Sentence:

1. From the time Helen had got out of bed this morning her incorrigible hair had refused to stay in any style suitable for a day showing prospective purchasers around the new apartments:

shutterstock_294821477

2.  ‘You’re an incorrigible old rogue, Grandad’, Mark said, unable to suppress a smile as the ruddy faced old man sidled over to the drinks cabinet and poured himself another generous Scotch. ‘You know what the doctor said about easing off on the booze, at least until after the test results. Mum’d have a fit if she knew.’

Grandad just winked, and grinned incorrigibly. ‘But yer mum’ll not know about it, will she, lad?’

shutterstock_256517065

3 After ten years of marriage to an incorrigible gambler, Alice had had enough: divorce was her only option:

A person playing at a gambling machine. Author: Jose Pereira. Creative Commons
A person playing at a gambling machine. Author: Jose Pereira. Creative Commons

*

I rather like this word, especially when used in a humorous and/or affectionate way, as in the second  ‘Use in a Sentence’ above.

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s Page

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Helicoid

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. and is a fun way to learn new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

This is my second time through the alphabet and I’m looking at the letter H this week. Last time round I did the word hirsute.

So here is my WOW for this week: 

helicoid

Word

Helicoid

Pronunciation:

hel•i•coid  [hɛlɪˌkɔɪd]

Audio:

(Pronunciation of this word is different for the U.K. and U.S.)

U.K. : hee-li-koid

U.S. : hel-i-koid

Part of Speech

Adjective

Related Forms:

Adjective: helicoidal

Adverb: helicoidally

Meaning:

  1. Adjective: coiled or curving like a spiral:
Grapevine Snail by Jurgen Schoner
Grapevine Snail by Jurgen Schoner: Wikimedia Commons

2. Noun: (geometry) a warped surface generated by a straight line moving so as to cut or touch a fixed helix.

Animation of Helicoid. Author: 09glasgow09 Wikimedia Commons
Animation of Helicoid. Author: 09glasgow09 Wikimedia Commons

Word Origin:

  • Late 17th century (1690-1700) from Greek helikoeidēs ‘of spiral form’, from helixhelik / helic + oid (where oid means resembling or like)

Synonyms:  

circular, circling, circumvoluted, spiral, corkscrew, curled, cochlear, helical, tendrillar, whorled, screw-shaped

Antonyms: 

straight, uncurling, unwinding

Use in a Sentence:

  1.   Bill wandered around his garden, his camera in his hand. The cucumber tendrils that curled in a delicate helicoid were simply too perfect to be ignored.
"Kurgiväät" by Robert Reisman (WooteleF) - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kurgiv%C3%A4%C3%A4t.jpg#/media/File:Kurgiv%C3%A4%C3%A4t.jpg
Cucumber tendril. Photographer: Robert Reisman  Wikimedia Commons

2. The staicase in the old building had been designed like a never-ending helicoid:

Image courtesy of Pixabay
Image courtesy of Pixabay

3. For this I have written a short story. It mght be best for anyone who detests physical geography to just ignore it.  🙂

Meander in Ashes Hollow. Author S, Knights.https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Meander_in_Ashes_Hollow.jpg
Meander in Ashes Hollow. Author S. Knights: Wikimedia Commons

Mr. Anderson gestured to the meander along a section of the winding stream the Year 10 students had come to study as part of their geography field work.

‘Right then,’ he started, ‘who can tell me how the helicoidal flow of the river contributes to the development of a meander?’

Fifteen year old Matthew Johnson raised his hand. ‘Helicoidal flow means the way the water flows in spirals, a bit like a corkscrew, Sir.’

‘OK… good so far, Matthew.  Now we know what helicoidal flow means. So how can we apply that knowledge to explain how it helps the development of a meander?’

Mary Scrimshaw tentatively raised her hand. ‘It’s to do with the way the surface flow of the water hits the outer, steeper bank, over there,’ she said, pointing across the stream, ‘helping to further erode it. Then the water sort of does a somersault as it bounces off it…’ She hesitated as a few students giggled at the idea of the water doing a somersault.

‘Excellent, Mary,’ Mr Anderson said with an encouraging smile. ‘The somersault you describe is due to the helicoidal motion of the water. Anything more to add…?

Mary took a breath. ‘The water that hits the outer bank then flows along the river bed – eroding more material as it goes, making the middle of the meander quite deep.  Then, when this eroded … er … sediment reaches the opposite bank – the inside bank, that is, where the current is slower – the river dumps it. This makes a sort of little beach on that side.’

Mr. Anderson beamed. ‘Wonderful, Mary… Now, would someone else tell us what we call this area that Mary described as like a ‘little beach’.

‘It’s a slip-off slope’, Jamie Rogers, blurted, looking pleased with himself for knowing that.

‘Hand up, next time James,’ Mr Anderson reproved. ‘But you’re right, a slip-off slope it is.

‘Now, before you begin your sketches, I need to remind you that all this is due to the helicoidal flow and I’d like your completed cross-sections that accompany your sketch to clearly illustrate how that works…’

***

I must confess that I don’t find helicoid a particularly attractive word. I’d much prefer to use helical or spiral in my writing. Helicoid works very well in maths and geography, though. And, after all, my WOW posts are not just restricted to beautiful words – much as we all like them. Many words in our vocabulary are not lovely… but certainly just as important.

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s Page

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Febrile

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m looking at the letter F this week.

So here is my WOW for this week: 

febrile

Word

Febrile

Pronunciation:

fe·brile  [fee-bruh l, feb-ruh l or, especially British, fee-brahyl]

Audio:

febrile

Part of Speech

Adjective

Related Forms:

Noun: febrility

Meaning:

  1. Having or showing the symptoms of a fever: a febrile illness:

influenza-156098_1280

2.  Characterised by a great deal of nervous excitement or energy: the febrile atmosphere of the city following the riots:

Riots in the Republic of Korea. Courtesy of Pixabay
Riots in the Republic of Korea. Courtesy of Pixabay

 

Word Origin:

1645-55 < New Latin, Medieval Latin febrīlis (fever)

Synonyms:

Meaning 1:   feverish, hot, fevered, flushed, fiery, inflamed, delirious, febrific, pyretic (medicine), burning, buring up, sweating

Meaning 2:   anticipatory, interested, excited

Antonyms:

afebrile

Use in a Sentence:

1. Dr. Dennis looked levelly at Janet. ‘I must inform you, Mrs. Eliot, that your son’s febrile condition is synonymous with that of patients suffering from malaria, the disease caused by the bite of an infected mosquito. I believe he has just returned from the South America. . .?

mosquito-719613_1280
Image courtesy of Pixabay

2. The atmosphere in the large stadium was febrile as teenagers screamed their approval of the latest hit single by their idol, Frothing Freddie from Framlington:

shutterstock_265539302

3. Signor Lorenzo Abbatelli sang with febrile intensity throughout the evening performance:

opera-singer-151746_1280
Image courtesy of Pixabay

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s Page

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Ephemeral

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m looking at the letter E this week.

So here is my WOW for this week: 

ephemeralWord

Ephemeral

Pronunciation:

e·phem·er·al  [ih-fem-er-uh-l]

Audio:

ephemeral

Part of Speech

Adjective

Related Forms:

Adverb: ephemerally

Noun: ephemeralness; ephemerality

Meaning

  1.  Lasting for a markedly brief time:

Eating the chocolate ice-cream was an ephemeral pleasure in Ellie’s otherwise hectic day.

shutterstock_174475220
2.  Having a short lifespan or a short annual period of aboveground growth. Used especially of plants – as in chickweed:

Chickweed is known as an ephemeral weed because it produces several generations in one season.

Stellaria Media Common Chickweed. Author: Lazaregadnizda. Wikimedia Commons
Stellaria Media Common Chickweed. Author: Lazaregadnizda. Wikimedia Commons

3.  Noun: Anything that is short-lived, as certain insects – like mayflies.

Mayflies emerge from the water and live for only 24 hours – in which time they must mate and the female lay the eggs on the surface of the water. If enough of them appear at the same time, as in some species, they create a swarm.

Mayfly swarming on Tisza Author: Kovacs,sziland. Commons
Mayfly swarming on Tisza. Author: Kovacs,sziland. Commons

Word Origin:

1570-80; from the Greek ephḗmer (os) meaning short-lived, lasting but a day

Synonyms:

evanescent, transient, momentary, brief, fleeting, impermanent, fugitive, passing, brief, temporary, transitory, short-lived, fugacious, short

Antonyms:

permanent

Use in a Sentence:

  1. The blaze of colour along the valley seemed all the more wonderful to the hikers because it was so ephemeral: choice-975832_1280 (2)

2. Lucy gazed at the old photo of two models wearing 1930’s style swimsuits, considering how fashions were so ephemeral: new ones come in and old ones disappear, perhaps to be reintroduced at a later date:

Fashion Photo: Bathing Suit, Modell Schenk. Circa 1930. Author: Yva (1900-1942). Public Domain: Wikimedia Commons
Fashion Photo: Bathing Suit, Modell Schenk. Circa 1930. Author: Yva (1900-1942). Public Domain: Wikimedia Commons

3. For my third example ‘sentence’ I have concocted this little tale, in which I have attempted to use the various forms of this week’s WOW:

archer-149224_640

King Eldrin of Elf Land glared at his daughter, Elinora, her pretty face marred by yet another ephemeral scowl. Desperately wanting the wilful young princess out of his hair, he hoped one of today’s contenders would suit her style.

But Elinora had rejected several suitors already, her affections as ephemeral as the beautiful daylilies adorning Eldrin’s palace grounds.

Red and yellow daylily, called a Red Magic Lily. Author: Victorrocha. Commons.
Red and yellow daylily, called a Red Magic Lily. Author: Victorrocha. Commons.

The ephemerality of Elinora’s affections worried King Eldrin, as his daughter was rapidly leaving her youth behind. His worried subjects would soon be assigning her spinster status. He understood too well the ephemeralness of beauty. One only had to look at his wife, Queen Ermintrude, whose rare beauty had rapidly deteriorated post wedlock. Before long she had begun to resemble the cow* after whom she was named.

Today, a handsome young prince named Elandorr would attempt to engage Elinora in ephemerally interesting conversation. As long as it held the girl’s attention for an hour, Eldrin would declare him the victor in this marriage game, as previously arranged. With a bit of luck, Elinora and her ephemeral nature would henceforth be Elandorr’s problem.

shutterstock_275929637* Ermintrude was the name of the cow in the 1960’s cartoon series called The Magic Roundabout – since made into a film. Ermintrude was really quite sweet, so I mean no offence to her! All the pictures I could find of her were copyright, hence I’ve none to show here. 😦

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s Page

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Diminutive

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m looking at the letter D this week.

I’m still in the middle of my Malta posts. Back to those soon . . .

So, here is my WOW for this week: 

diminutive

Word:

Diminutive

Pronunciation:

di·min·u·tive  [dih-min-yuh-tiv]   (dɪˈmɪn yə tɪv)

Audio: diminutive

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

Adverb: diminutively

Noun: diminutiveness

Meaning:

  1. adj. Extremely or extraordinarily small:

    Diminutive doorway. A tiny doorway, 18inches high, in an ancient wall on Motherby Hill. The notice on the door says:
    Diminutive doorway. A tiny doorway, 18 inches high, in an ancient wall on Motherby Hill. The notice on the door says: “DANGER steep staircase”. Source: geograph.org.uk. Author: Richard Croft.

2. n. Grammar: Of or being a suffix that indicates smallness or qualities such a youth, familiarity, affection – or even contempt. Egs: -let in booklet, -kin in lambkin, or -et in nymphet, or – ette, as in kitchenette.

An example of a Canadian cuisinette /kitchenette in a studio apartment in Quebec. Author: Shadiac. Commons
An example of a Canadian cuisinette /kitchenette in a studio apartment in Quebec. Author: Shadiac. Commons

3. A diminutive suffix, word or name, e.g. Maggie for Margaret, Tommy /Tommie for Thomas. (My son, Thomas – fifth ‘child’ now 34 – positively refuses to answer to Tommy!)

4. n. A very small person or thing (persons in this example):

Diminutive humans attack a giant cat. A ghost-like figure sits in a boat at the top left. Wellcome Trust mages. Commons
Diminutive humans attack a giant cat. A ghost-like figure sits in a boat at the top left.
Wellcome Trust mages. Commons

Word Origin:

1350-1400; Middle English diminutif, from Old French, from Latin dīminutīvus, from dīminūtus, past participle of dīminuere.

Synonyms:

small, little, tiny, minute, pocket-sized, mini, wee, miniature, petite, midget, undersized, teeny-weeny, Lilliputian, bantam, teensy-weensy, pygmy, flyspeck

Antonyms:

big, enormous, giant, huge, immense, important, large, tall

Use in a Sentence:

  1. We emerged from the pine forest into an open space, with a diminutive loch, little more than a pond, at the centre of it:
Diminutive Fir Loch. geograph.org.uk. Author: Des Colhoun. Commons
Diminutive Fir Loch. geograph.org.uk. Author: Des Colhoun. Commons

2. The body of the female Giant House Spider can reach 18.5 mm (0.73 in) in length, with that of the male being much more diminutive at 12.7 mm (1.5 in):

Female Giant House Spider, of the genus Tegenaria atrica, building its second egg sac. From Cologne, Germany. Author: Sarefo. Commons
Female Giant House Spider, of the genus Tegenaria atrica, building its second egg sac. From Cologne, Germany. Author: Sarefo. Commons

3. In the silent room at one minute to midnight on Christmas Eve, the diminutive green-clad elf hopped down from the Christmas tree, ready to help Santa unload his toys when he came down the chimney:

A diminutive Christmas elf on a Christmas tree decoration. Originally posted on Flickr. Author: Jolene Morris. Commons
A diminutive Christmas elf on a Christmas tree decoration. Originally posted on Flickr. Author: Jolene Morris. Commons

*

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s Page

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Buffoon

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’ve now been through the alphabet once, so I’ve started again, and am now looking at the letter B.

So, here is my WOW for this week: 

buffoon

Word:

Buffoon

Meaning

  1. A person who does silly things, usually to make other people laugh:
Jester-Joker Card001 by GoShaw. Creative Commons
Jester-Joker Card001 by GoShaw. Creative Commons

2.  A person given to coarse or undignified joking (a boor).

Pronunciation:  

buf·foon  [buhfoon]

Audio: buffoon. (No discernible difference between UK and US pronunciations for this one.)

Part of Speech: 

Noun

Related Forms:

Noun: buffoonery

Adjective: buffoonish

Word Origin:

Mid 16th century: from French bouffon, from Italian buffone, from medieval Latin buffo, meaning ‘clown’. Originally recorded as a rare Scottish word for a kind of pantomime dance, the term later (late 16th century) denoted a professional jester.

“Buffoon Playing a Lute”. Auhtor Frans Hals, 1623. Oil on canvas. Current location: Louvre Museum. Photographer: Web Galley ally of Art. Public Domain

Synonyms:

jester, clown, fool, boor, comic, comedian, wag, joker, dag (New Zealand, informal) harlequin, droll, silly-billy (informal), joculator or (fem) joculatrix, merry-andrew, zany, prankster.

Antonyms:

None

Use in a Sentence:

1. Once she got behind her desk, the generally quiet Teresa seemed to transform into a buffoon, hurling coarse and insulting remarks at her colleagues:

shutterstock_233068186

2. I hoped my husband would stop acting like a buffoon before our friends deserted us at the party:

shutterstock_580473. In most of their films, Bob Hope played the buffoon of the comedy duo, whilst Bing Crosby was the straight man.

Screen shot of Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour from
Screen shot of Bob Hope (left) Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour from “The Road to Bali”, 1952. Public Domain4. Adjecive use:  Six-year-old Jonathan was not impressed by the clown’s buff

4. (Use of related noun) On his first visit to the circus, Jonathan was not impressed by the clown’s constant buffoonery:

Image courtesy of Pixabay
Image courtesy of Pixabay

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Aplomb

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’ve now been through the alphabet once, so I’m starting again with the letter A.

So, here is my WOW for this week: 

aplomb

Word:

aplomb

Meaning: 

  1. Self-confidence or assurance, especially when in a demanding situation:

i-741498_1280

2. The perpendicular or vertical position:

404px-Plumb_bob
Plum-bob suspended on a string. Author: Jim Thomas. Commons

Pronunciation:  

a·plomb

uh-plom  [uh-pluhm]

Audio: aplomb (Quite a difference between the UK aand US pronunciations with this one.)

Part of Speech: 

Noun

Related Forms:

None

Word Origin:

1828, from the French aplomb (16th century) literally“perpendicularity”,  from the phrase à plomb “poised upright, balanced” –  literally “on the plumb-line,” from the Latin plumbum “(the metal) lead” of which the weight at the end of the line was made (as image above).

Synonyms:

equanamity, calmness, collectedness, composedness, composure, cool, coolness, countenance, equilibrium, imperturbability, placidity, repose, sangfroid, self-composedness, serenity, tranquility, tranquilness

Antonyms:

agitation, discomposure, perturbation, confusion,  doubt, uncertainty.

Use in a Sentence:

  1. Susan passed her driving test with her usual aplomb:

shutterstock_165365459

2. The famous artist showed aplomb when surrounded by so many reporters:

shutterstock_137148866

(Artist Florentijn Hofman surrounded by reporters. Shutterstock photo.)

3. The word aplomb comes from the use of a ‘plumb-line’ (with a metal weight, or ‘plumb-bob’, suspended at the end of it) to determine the verticality or depth of a building undergoing construction:

A plum-square from 'Cassell's Carpentry and Joinery'. Public Domain.
A plum-square from ‘Cassell’s Carpentry and Joinery’. Public Domain.

If you’d like to view more interesting wods, visit Heena’s

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Zoomorphic

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter Z this week another letter with limited choice, so I’ll be happy to get back to starting the alphabet again.

So, here is my WOW for this week: 

zoomorphic

Word:

Zoomorphic

Pronunciation:    

zoo-morphic (UK)  

zo-o-mor-phic  [zoh-uhmawr-fik]  (U.S)

Part of Speech: 

Adjective

Related Forms:

Noun: zoomorph; zoomorphism

Meaning:

  1. of or relating to a deity or other being conceived of as having the form of an animal:
633px-mosaic_pan_genazzano_massimo 3
Pavement mosaic with the head of Pan. Roman artwork, Antonine period (138-192 CE). Public Domain

Pavement mosaic with the head of Pan. Roman artwork, Antonine period (138-192 CE). Public Domain

2. characterised by a highly stylised or conventionalised representation of animal forms:

kellsdecoratedinitial1 6
Zoomorphic decoration from the Book of Kells. Uploaded by Soerfin. Public Domain

3. representing, or using, animal forms:

cowha 2
In Hinduism, the cow is the symbol of wealth, strength, abundance, selfless giving and a full Earthly life. Attribution: copyrighted to Himalayan Academy Publications, Kapaa Kauai, Hawaii. Commons

 

Synonyms:

None

Word Origin:

Late 19th century: from  zoo ‘of animals’ + Greek morphē ‘form’ + -ic

Use in a Sentence:

1. The Egyptian gods were often depicted as zoomorphic.

2. It was a very warm day when we visited the street fair, and one young man had taken off his shirt, revealing a zoomorphic tattoo on his left shoulder:

gallo_17876406125 5
Vincent Gallo tattoo at the Urban Bear strees Fair. Author: istolethetv. Commons

3. The White Horse at Uffington is thought to be a zoomorphic representation of some symbol or belief of a tribe of Ancient Britons, possibly the Artrebates:

uffington-white-horse-sat 4
The White Horse at Uffington, Oxfordshire, UK. Author: USGS. Public Domain

The White Horse at Uffington, Oxfordshire, UK. Author: USGS. Public Domain

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Whirligig

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter W this week so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with X

So, here is my WOW for this week:

whirligig

 Word: 

Whirligig

Pronunciation

whirl·i·gig

[hwur-li-gig]

Audio Link: 

Whirligig

Part of Speech: 

Noun

Related Forms:

Verb: whirligig

 Meaning:

1. Any spinning toy, such as a top

400px-Spinning_top_-_prague
Spinning top bought in Prague by Philippe Teuen from Belgium. Commons

2. A carousel; a merry-go-round

Carousel on London's Southy Bank during a summer festival. Photo: Andrew Dunn. Commons
Carousel on London’s Southy Bank during a summer festival. Photo: Andrew Dunn. Commons

3. Something that continuously whirls, spins or moves in a circular or giddy way (e.g. the whirligig of social life or a windmill)

Windmill at Marsh Hill, Thornton, Lancs. Author Roger W. Haworth, uploaded by Hohum. Commons
Windmill at Marsh Hill, Thornton, Lancs. Author Roger W. Haworth, uploaded by Hohum. Commons

4. A whirligig beetle (a small, black, predatory beetle which swims rapidly in circles on the surface of still or slow-moving water and dives when alarmed).

Whirligig beetle, Gyrinus natador. Author Edmund Reitter 91845-19209
Whirligig beetle, Gyrinus natador. Author Edmund Reitter 1845-1920.

Synonyms:

1. spinning top, humming top, whipping top, peg top,teetotum, plaything

2. merry-go-round, roundabout, fairground ride

3. (As a verb): spin, spin around, gyrate, reel, whirl, pirouette, spiral, rotate, roll, circle

4. beetle, water beetle, insect, bug

Antonyms: 

None

Word Origin:

Mid-15c: a child’s toy, from whirl (v) + gig (n). Meaning (‘anything in constant motion’ from the 1580s; ‘fickle flighty person’ is from 1600; a type of water beetle from 1713.

Use in a Sentence:

1. ‘Look at that whirligig up there in the sky!’ Susan said to her six year old son.

800px-Search_Rescue_Florida
Search and rescue helicopter in Florida. Uploaded by Versageek. Commons 

2. Doing the firm’s financial accounts left Marcia’s mind a complete whirligig.

shutterstock_215648725

3. It has often been said that Time is a whirligig and that all things come round again at some point, including fashions.

Wooden hourglass. Author: User: S. Sepp. Commons
Wooden hourglass. Author: User: S. Sepp. Commons

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Vacuous

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter V this week so I’ll be looking for a good word beginning with W

So, here is my WOW for this week:

vacuous

 Word: 

Vacuous

Pronunciation

vac·u·ous  (vak-yoo-uh s)

Audio Link: 

Vacuous

Part of Speech: 

Adjective

Related Forms:

Adverb: vacuously

Noun: vacuousness

 Meaning:

1. Lacking intelligence; stupid or empty-headed.

2. Devoid of expression; vacant: a vacuous stare.

3. Lacking substance or meaning; vapid or inane e.g. a vacuous comment.

4. Lacking serious purpose or occupation; idle: e.g. After a night almost devoid of sleep, John had a vacuous day at the office:

shutterstock_261060365

5. Devoid of matter; empty: e.g. a vacuous space.

Empty room in Group Omicrone. Author DK dence. Commons
Empty room in Group Omicrone. Author DK dence. Commons

Synonyms:

Vapid, stupid, inane, asinine, blank, mindless, meaningless, fatuous, vacant, empty, unintelligent, incommunicative, uncommunicative.

Antonym: 

Full

Word Origin:

1640s: empty, from Latin vacuus – empty, void, free (as in vacuum). The figurative sense of ‘empty of ideas’ is from 1848.

Use in a Sentence:

1. John worried that after a few too many cocktails, Erica’s mind would become vacuous:

shutterstock_117742627 2. The demonstrators were chanting particularly vacuous slogans:

3. (Adverb use). At weekends, Kathy gossiped vacuously for hours with her friends:

shutterstock_269023124

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure