Weekly Word – Nebulous

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter N:

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Meaning:

1.  Cloudy, misty or hazy e.g. indistinct shapes in the gloom

2.  (Of a concept) lacking definite form or limits; vague; not clearly defined or easy to understand

3.  (As in astronomy) of, relating to, or characteristic of a nebula or nebulae (plural) in deep space; nebular

  • For a good, simple definition of a nebula and nebulae see this one from Nasa.
Image by WikiImages from Pixabay

Pronunciation:

neb·u·lous  /  neb-yuh-luhs   (nĕb′yə-ləs)

Audio Link:

NEBULOUS

Related Forms:

nebulously (adverb)

nebulousness (noun)

Synonyms:

Ambiguous  amorphous  indistinct  indefinite  indeterminate  unclear  vague  ill-defined  imprecise hazy  cloudy  murky misty  fuzzy unformed  shadowy  confused  lacking definition  opaque  blurred  blurry  out of focus  foggy  faint  shadowy  dim  obscure  shapeless  formless  nebulose

Antonyms:

clear  well-defined

Word Origin:

As in Sense I: Middle English (1375-1425) from Latin nebulōsus, from nebula, cloud

Sense 2 dates from the 19th century

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1.  Believing himself to be alone in the deserted old farmhouse, the nebulous shape coming towards him in the hall gave Jim the shock of his life. There was nothing for it but to turn tail and run.

SuperHerftigGeneral from Pixabay
SuperHerftigGeneral from Pixabay

2.  After listening for the best part of an hour to the CEO rambling nebulously about his plans to increase the productivity of the firm, few of the employees were any the wiser.

Photo by Antenna on Unsplash

3.  Waking up in a hospital bed following the car accident, Mike’s memory of what happened was decidedly nebulous for several hours.

Image by Akent879 from Pixabay

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

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Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Maunder

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter M:

Part of Speech:

Verb (intransitive)

Meaning:

1.  Talk in a rambling, indistinct, incoherent or disconnected manner

2.  Move or act in a dreamy or idle manner; wander slowly and aimlessly

3. Grumble (chiefly British  to express dissatisfaction, pain, or resentment usually tiresomely)

Pronunciation:

Morn-der   (UK)

maun·der  (US)

Audio Link:

MAUNDER

Related Forms:

Maunders verb (plural) and 3rd person partciple

Maundering (adj)

Maundered (past participle)

Maundering (adj)

Maunderingly

Maunderer (n)

Synonyms:

ramble  prattle  prate  blather  blether  blither  drivel  rattle  chatter  jabber  gabble  babble slabber  gab  yak  yabber  yatter  rabbit  witter  waffle  natter  chunter  twaddle clack

Antonyms: 

crow  delight

Word Origin:

17th century (1622) in the meaning defined at  Sense 1, perhaps from the obsolete maunder, meaning to beg – from the Latin mendīcāre.

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. Miss Stevens carried the requested files into the office, as usual maundering about her aching back.

2. If this  man continued to maunder on for much longer, Charlie would have no other option than to tell him to his face that he bored the socks off people.

3.  Jane maundered across country fields for most of the day, trying to clear her mind of the humdrum that had become her everyday life.

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Lugubrious

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter L:

lugubrius

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Meaning:

Looking or sounding sad and dismal, especially in an affected or exaggerated manner

Pronunciation:

loo-goo-bree-uhs    ((lʊˈɡuːbrɪəs)

Audio Link:

LUGUBRIOUS

Related Forms:

lugubriously (adverb)

lugubriousness and lugubriosity (nouns)

Synonyms:

sad  melancholy  morose  gloomy  dismal  pensive  doleful  mournful  dreary  serious  woeful  woebegone  sorrowful  depressing  unhappy  downhearted  glum  forlorn  crestfallen  downcast  funereal  brokenhearted  blue disconsolate  sombre  subdued  despondent

Antonyms: 

cheerful  joyful  bright  friendly cordial  cheery comforting cheering  festive  sunshiny

Word Origin:

Late 16th – early 17th century (1585 – 1605) from the Latin lugubris meaning mournful (from the Latin verb lugere: to mourn) + English ous

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. Ten-year-old Michael suddenly charged through the back door. ‘Mum, what’s the matter with Charlie? He looks really sad and miserable. Is he ill?’

‘No he isn’t – and don’t let that lugubrious face he pulls fool you. He’s just feeling sorry for himself because I caught him eating the cat’s food and chased him out. And he can jolly well stay there until I decide to forgive him.’

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Image by Christine Klassen from Pixabay

2. I’d waited for what seems like hours at a bus stop when a whole convoy of buses with the same destination arrived with lugubrious slowness.

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Image by manfred Kindlinger from Pixabay

3. The lugubriousness of the view that hit us as we rounded a bend caused a wave of sadness to wash over me. Could this neglected, derelict old  building really be the same pretty house of my childhood… a house that had once been filled with laughter and love?

‘Don’t worry, sweetheart,’ my husband said, smiling at me. ‘The house might look woefully lugubrious now, but the workmen I’ve hired will have it looking bright and cheerful before we know it, even on the gloomiest of days.’

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Photo by eberhard grossgasteiger from Pexels

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Kibosh

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter K:

kibosh

Meaning:

To spoil or destroy an idea or plan; stop from happening or developing (usually used in the phrase, to put the kibosh on); nonsense

Pronunciation:

kahy-bosh, ki-bosh

Audio Link:

kibosh

Part of Speech:

Noun

Related Forms:

Kibosh (transitive verb)

Kiboshes (3rd person present)

Kiboshed (past tense and past participle)

Kiboshing (present participle/gerund)

Synonyms:

veto, halt, interfere with, stop, scotch, inhibit, prohibit, nip in the bud, put a stop to, disrupt, thwart, quash, curb, cancel, check, hamper, hobble, bring to an end

Antonyms: 

allow, permit, start, impel, give permission, propel

Word Origin:

First recorded in 1830–40; of obscure origin.

The following is from a number of sites including the Merriam Webster Dictionary:

Kibosh has been a part of the English language for almost two centuries, but its origin baffles etymologists. It was common in lower-class London speech and used by Dickens in 1836 in an early sketch. One source states that in early 19th century England,  colloquially, the phrase, to put the kibosh on meant ‘to castigate, overwhelm (a person or political party such as the Whigs, who were failing to outlaw flogging in the military). In this case, the origin of kibosh could have been the alteration or imitation of kurbash – a whip. There are several other possible origins of the word, amongst others one from Yiddish and one from Gaelic, but I won’t go into them all here. There are also a variety of spellings such as kibbosh, kybosh and kyebosk – all of unclear origin.

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. He put the kibosh on any plans his young daughter had made to attend the party with her new boyfriend.

shutterstock_1081654757
Image from Shutterstock

2.  The presence of a large crowd was kiboshing the entire police operation.

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Image from Shutterstock

3.  The unexpected downpour kiboshed their hopes of spending the afternoon picnicking in the park.

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Image by janrye from Pixabay

4.  ‘Write it out again when you’re fully awake,’ Mrs Henderson said after casting a critical eye over Monica’s application for promotion. ‘As it stands this is kibosh and won’t even get you an interview let alone the elevated position you want.’

pexels-photo-442750
Image from Pexels

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Jaunty

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter J

jaunty

Meaning:

1.  Easy and sprightly in manner or bearing; happy and confident

2.  Smartly trim or stylishly chic in clothing:

3. Archaic: genteel

Pronunciation:

jawn-tee, jahn-tee

Audio Link:

jaunty

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

Jauntier (comparative adjective)

Jauntiest (superlative adjective)

Jauntily (adverb)

Jauntiness (noun)

Synonyms:

In the sense of sprightly:

carefree, high-spirited, devilish, dashing, jocund, perky, animated, jolly, jovial, cocky, sparky, bold, confident, buoyant, playful, impish

In the sense of smart in dress:

Smart, trim, dapper, stylish, spruce, showy, dashing, chic (a jaunty little hat):

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Image by Виктория Бородинова from Pixabay

Antonyms: 

depressing, cheerless, listless, depressed, lackadaisical, cheerless, sedate, lethargic, inactive

unfashionable, unstylish

Word Origin:

C17 (1655-65) earlier jentee or juntee from the French gentil (noble, gentle or genteel)

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1.  Mary lifted young Jack onto her back and followed behind his twin brother, Joe, who scampered along jauntily on their way to the fair.

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.. Image by Emmie_Norfolk from Pixabay

2.  As they reached the fair, Joe clapped his hands in excitement as the familiar jaunty music of the merry-go-round filled the afternoon air.

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Image by Martin Ludlam from Pixabay

3.  The jauntiness in the steps of the three friends spoke of their enjoyment in each other’s company during their hike across the countryside.

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Image from Shutterstock

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Innovative

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter I:

innovative

Meaning:

A product or idea featuring new, advanced and original methods; a person introducing new creative and original ideas in thinking; introducing innovations

Pronunciation:

in-uh-vey-tiv   (ɪn əˌveɪ tɪv)

Audio Link:

innovative

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

innovatively (adverb)

innovativeness (noun)

Synonyms:

original innovatory (British English) innovational new cutting-edge novel fresh unconventional unorthodox unusual unfamiliar unprecedented avant-garde experimental inventive ingenious advanced modern modernistic ultra-modern state-of-the-art futuristic pioneering groundbreaking trailblazing revolutionary radical

Antonyms: 

uncreative unimaginative uninventive unoriginal

Word Origin:

Late Middle English (1600-1610) from the Latin innovation, from the verb innovare

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. Despite being a hot-headed, violent man, often in trouble with the law and implicated in more than one murder, Caravaggio created striking, innovative paintings and pioneered the use of dramatic lighting and the representation of religious figures in modern clothes and attitudes.

The_Beheading_of_Saint_John-Caravaggio_(1608)
The Beheading of Saint John the Baptist by Caravaggio, 1608. Current location: St. John’s Co-Cathedral, Valetta, Malta. Public Domain

2. Miss Reynolds stood before the class of sixteen-year-olds, her steely gaze reminding them she did not tolerate inattention. ‘Now,’ she started, adjusting her dark-rimmed spectacles, ‘last lesson we watched a short film about the many ways in which plastic pollution is affecting our oceans. So today you will work in groups to create a convincing presentation on how any one of those problems could be dealt with and, where possible, offer alternative materials that could be used in the place of those causing the problems. Credit will be given for innovative ideas and on how innovatively you present them.

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Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

3 The new company in town was known not only for its excellent working conditions and pension schemes for employees, but for the many opportunities for promotion it offered to those who showed innovativeness and flair.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Hubris

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter H:

hubris

Meaning:

Excessive pride or foolish amount of self-confidence in one’s own abilities; a way of talking or behaving that is too proud and offends people.

Pronunciation:

hyoo-bris (hoo-bris)

Audio Link:

Hubris

Part of Speech:

Noun

Synonyms:

Arrogance, conceit, conceitedness, haughtiness, pride, nerve, vanity, self-importance, self-conceit, ostentation, pomposity, insolence, superciliousness, hauteur, big-headedness, boastfulness, pretension, pretentiousness, audacity, chuzpah, disdain.

Antonyms: 

Modesty, unselfishness, bashfulness, shyness, humility, self doubt, self loathing, altruism

Related Forms:

Hubristic (adjective)

Word Origin:

First recorded in 1880–85, HUBRIS is from the Greek word hýbris, meaning insolence.

(In Greek tragedy HUBRIS means excessive pride towards, or in defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis/punishment.)

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. From his seat in the clouds, Apollo focused on the young Trojan prince as he drew back his bow. Not renowned for his archery skills, Paris would not feel confident of his arrow finding its mark. But Apollo would ensure that the arrow flew straight to Achilles’ heel – the only vulnerable spot on the seemingly invincible Greek’s body. Achilles had greatly angered the gods with his pride and defiance and would pay dearly for his hubris.

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Image by Oberholster Venita from Pixabay

2. The conductor put down his baton and nodded approvingly at the end of the orchestra’s rehearsal. The new violinist was not only extremely talented, she lacked the hubristic behaviour common to many musicians he’d employed in the past.

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Image by S. Hermann & F. Richter from Pixabay

3. After putting up with her friend’s haughty and conceited ways since their schooldays, Erin suddenly flipped. ‘I’ve had it with you, Gloria. I’m sick of defending your pomposity to everyone. And believe me, once I stop lying through my teeth and telling them all how nice you are beneath that arrogant veneer, you won’t have a friend left in this town.’ She stood to leave. ‘And you know what…? From now on, you won’t even have me. Find another stooge to put up with your ridiculous hubris.’

shutterstock_657710485

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

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Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Gobbledegook

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter G:

gobbledegook

or…

gobbledygook

The two spellings seem to be used in both the UK and the US, but the most used spelling seems to be the second one (whereas I have always used the first).

Meaning:

1.  Complicated or technical language that is difficult to understand, especially when used in official documents or instruction manuals.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

2.  Although Meaning (1) above still remains in use, gobbledegook is sometimes used to mean simply nonsensical or silly (i.e. not necessarily jargon or pretentious wording):

Parents watched as the children played their party games, their happy chatter sounding like gobbledegook to adult ears.

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Pronunciation:

gobuhl-dee-gook

Audio Link:

Gobbledegook

Part of Speech:

Noun (Informal)

Synonyms:

nonsense, babble, balderdash, boloney, drivel, poppycock, mumbo jumbo, twaddle, gibberish, claptrap

Antonyms: 

fact, frankness, honesty, openness, sense, truth, truthfulness

Related Forms:

None

Word Origin:

1940s (originally US): probably imitating a turkey’s gobble.

Texas Congressman Maury Maverick coined the word in 1944 to describe the frustrating jargon used by policymakers in Washington. It reminded him of the sound of turkeys gobbling.

turkey-1456681_1280

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. ‘Okay, I’ve heard enough,’ Greg said none too politely, cutting through the salesman’s jargon. ‘Forget the rest of the gobbledegook and just tell me how much the car costs.’

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2. After listening to the closing speeches at the end of the trial, Monica’s head was spinning. Sifting the truth from the deluge of what sounded like gobbledegook spouted by witnesses and judges alike would not be an easy matter. shutterstock_1513707167

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

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Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Frowsty

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter F:

frowsty

Meaning:

British:

(Of a room): having a stale, warm, and stuffy atmosphere, often with an unpleasant smell due to the lack of fresh air

(Of a person or item):  having a slovenly or uncared-for appearance

Pronunciation:

frou-stee  ((frausti)

Audio Link:

Frowsty

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Synonyms:

stuffy musty airless unventilated fusty close muggy stifling suffocating oppressive stale stagnant smelly fetid malodorous rank damp acrid

Antonyms: 

airy ventilated

Related Forms:

Frowstier (comparative adjective)

Frowstiest (superlative asjective)

Other words from Frowsty:

Frowstily (adverb)

Frowstiness (noun)

Word Origin:

British

First recorded in 1860–65; perhaps dialectal variant of frowzy (of unknown origin)

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. Mary couldn’t understand how her sophisticated mother could enjoy the company of a gaggle of frowsty old women who spent their afternoons in an even frowstier old bingo hall.

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2. Doctor Simons caught his breath as he followed the old man into his home. An overpowering stench of sickness filled the frowsty, overly warm room and his first impulse was to throw back the shutters to allow the fresh air to circulate.

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3. The frowstiness of the air inside the derelict brewery told of years of it being locked and barred from the outside world.

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***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

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Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Equanimity

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter E:

equanimity

Meaning:

A calm mental state, especially after a shock or disappointment or in a difficult situation; emotional stability or composure so that you never lose your temper or become upset

Pronunciation:

e-kwuhnim-i-tee

Audio Link:

Equanimity

Part of Speech:

Noun

Synonyms:

Calm, calmness, composure, cool, poise, sangfoid, self-possession self-control, aplomb, placidity, balance

Antonyms: 

Discomposure, anxiety, frustration, doubt, excitableness, alarm, agitation

Related Forms:

Equanimous (adjective)

Word Origin:

Early 17th century (1600-10) from the Latin aequanimitas – which is equivalent to aequ(us), meaning even, plain, equal + anim(us) meaning ‘mind’, spirit, feeling.

Use the Word in a Sentence:

1. Sitting out here, gazing across this beautiful lake, was the only way that Mike could restore his equanimity after his latest row with his wife. How sad to think that their once loving and equanimous relationship had turned so sour.

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Image by 畅 苏 from Pixabay

2. Our neighbour was such a kind old man who always exuded an air of equanimity:

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Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay 

3. No matter how tense or stressed Janet felt after a hard day at the office, a session of yoga was enough to ensure that her equanimity soon returned.

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Image by 3333873 from Pixabay

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock