Word of Week (WOW) – Yammer

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter Y this week and, as with X, I’ve had limited choice for this week’s word – and I imagine Z will be just as bad. I can’t wait to get back to starting the alphabet again.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

yammer

Word: 

yammer

Pronunciation:

yam•mer (ˈyæm ər)

Audio link:

yammer

Part of Speech: 

verb

Related Forms:

noun: yammer; yam·mer·er 

adverb: yammeringly

Meaning:

As a verb:

1. to utter or whine in a complaining or peevish manner

2. to make a complaint, loudly or persistently:  shutterstock_187060769

3. (intransitive) esp of an animal, to howl or wail plaintively or distressingly; yelp or yowl.

As a noun:

  1. yammer e.g. The yammer of animated conversation emanated from the boardroom:
exchange-of-ideas-222788_640
Image courtesy of Pixabay

2. a yammering sound, wail, or utterance

3. nonsense; jabber

Synonyms:

beef, bellyache, bitch, bleat, carp, caterwaul, croak, fuss, gripe, grizzle, grouch, grouse, growl, grumble, grump, holler, keen, moan, murmur, mutter, nag, repine, scream, squawk, squeal, wail, whimper, whinge, whine, complain, yawp/yaup, yowl.

Antonyms: 

crow, delight, rejoice

Word Origin:

Middle English yameren, alteration of yomeren -to murmur, be sad – from Old English gēomrian -akin to Old High German  jāmaron, to be sad.  First known use: 15th century

Use in a Sentence:

1. After the earthquake, the seismographs yammered for days:

shutterstock_128742788

2. Maria escorted the old lady back to her house, smiling patiently as she yammered on about the old days:

Old_woman_walk

3. Chris yawned, willing the teacher to stop yammering about boring algebraic equations:

shutterstock_41671063

4.  Left alone in the isolated cottage, Judith found the constant yammer of the guard dog quite unnerving:

dog-29392_640
Image courtesy of Pixabay

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Xenolith

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter this week and this one was a bit of a challenge. There are relatively few words beginning with X, and many of the words that do either refer to something biological, botanical, or chemical, or are names of people or places. I ended up picking a noun that is familiar to me, and I want to attempt a couple of sentences using it in a metaphorical way, or perhaps in a simile.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

xenolith

Word: 

xenolith

Part of Speech: 

noun

Related Forms:

xenolithic: adjective

Pronunciation

xen·o·lith  (zěn’ə-lĭth’, zē’nə-)  

Audio link:

xenolinth

Meaning:

(Geological Sceience) a fragment of rock differing in origin, composition, structure, etc, from the igneous rock enclosing it.

Included fragment of granite within basalt. Near Georgeville, Nova Scotia. Rygel M.C. Commons
Included fragment of granite within basalt. Near Georgeville, Nova Scotia. Rygel M.C. Commons

Synonyms:

inclusion

Antonyms: 

None

Word Origin:

1894 – 1905; xeno (foreign, strange) + lith (stone)

Use in a Sentence:

1. (Adjective use) The xenolithic nature of the rock gave it an exotic appeal:

Garnet_lherzolite_-_xenolith_from_a_kimberlite_pipe,_Kimberley_SA
Garnet Iherzolite xenolith from Kimberley, South Africa. (Garnet – purplish-red, olivine – dark green, chromian dioxide pyroxene – bright green). Author: James St, John, uploaded by Tillman. Commons.

2. Against the dull grey of the lava flow, the xenolith of yellow peridotite stood out like the moon in the darkening night sky:

1024px-Nephelinit
‘Nephelinit’ by Benutzer Derhammer. Rounded, yellow, weathered peridotite xenolith in nephelinite lava flow. Kaiserstuhl, SW Germany. Commons

3. The moon was a xenolith in the indigo sky of night:

moon-824378_640

4. The small girl in the purple dress was like a xenolith in the vast green meadow:

human-765734_640

Last two images courtesy of Pixabay.

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Ethereal

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to it as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

ethereal

Word: Ethereal

Part of Speech:  Adjective

(Adverb: ethereally.  Noun: ethereality; etherealness)

 Pronunciation:  e – the – re -al     (ih – theer – ee – uh – l)

 Meaning:

1. Extremely light or delicate, especially in  an unnatural way; refined

2. Of the celestial spheres; heavenly

3. Relating to, containing, or resembling a chemical ether

Synonyms:  

1. ghostly, vaporous, wraithlike, waiflike, bodiless, fragile, frail, intangible, immaterial, incorporeal, diaphonous, non-physical

2. spiritual, sublime, divine, holy, Elysian, unearthly, otherworldly

Antonyms:

Substantial, earthly, worldy, corporeal, concrete, tangible, material

Word Origin:   

First documented use in English 1505-15 >  Latin aethere (us) > Greek aithérios 

Use in a sentence: 

1. Sarah gazed at the ethereal wings of a dragonfly.

shutterstock_112399145

2. Beyond the stars is the ethereal realm of the divine. (As in fantasy, mythology etc.)

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3. Deborah was small, fair and ethereal.

4. The stained-glass windows gave the church an ethereal glow

*

Note. This word is not to be confused with ephemeral, which means transitory or short- lived – like a mayfly. I like both words and the ways in which they can be used.

  If you would like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Duplicity

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

duplicity

Word: Duplicity

Part of Speech:  Noun

Adjective: duplicitous

Plural: duplicities

Nearby Words:

duplicate, duplicating, duplication, duplicator,duplicature, duplicatus

 Pronunciation:

UK: due-plic-i-tee (dyu-plic-i-tee)

US: du-plic-i-ty (doo-plic-i-tee)

 Meaning:

1. Deliberate deceptiveness in behaviour or speech (especially by saying different things to two people).

2. An instance of deliberate deceptiveness; double dealing

3. The quality or state of being twofold or double

Synonyms:  

cunning, deceit, deceitfulness, deception, double-dealing, guile, shiftiness, dissimulation, fraud, hypocrisy

Antonyms:

candidness, directness, honesty, straightforwardness

Word Origin:  

1400-50 Late Middle English fron the Middle French duplicite. The roots of the word can be found in the Late Latin word, duplicatas and duplex.  The most common sense of duplicity today is deceitfulnessThe roots of this meaning can be found in the initial  ‘dupl’ – from the Latin duplex, meaning twofold, or double.

Use in a sentence: 

1. Martha was not a woman for compromise or duplicity.

2. The salesman was not averse to a little duplicity in his dealings with customers.

*

I particularly like the adjective of this word: duplicitous. I have a few duplicitous characters in my books. I also use the word perfidious, which can also be a synonym of duplicitous (but has other meanings as well, including unfaithful and treasonous). To me, both duplicitous and perfidious sound so much more interesting than just saying deceitful.

 *

shutterstock_128368295

If you would like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Coterminous

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to your post as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

coterminous

Word: Coterminous

Part of Speech:  Adjective

(Comparative: more coterminous, Superlative: most coterminous)

Adverb: coterminously or conterminously

 Pronunciation:  co – ter – min – ous (kō-tûr′mə-nəs)

 Meaning:

1. Having the same border or covering the same area

2. Being the same in extent; coextensive in range or scope

Synonyms:  

coetaneous, coeval, coexistent, coexisting, coextensive, coincident, coincidental, concurrent, contemporaneous, contemporary, commensurate, simultaneous, synchronic, synchronous, nearby, close, adjacent, neighbouring, immediate, adjoining, near, proximate,

Antonyms:

asynchronous, noncontemporary, nonsimultaneous, nonsynchronous, distant

Word Origin:

C17: from Latin conterminus, from con- + terminus – end, boundary

Use in a sentence: 

To illustrate the use of this word, here is a short poem, written by Heath Muchena on his blog, I of July:

I say this with some diffidence

that the world is full of struggles for recognition

coterminous with the quest for love and reverence

but also fears of indifference

and tears of rejection

*

This is a lovely poem and shows that the word is not only used in connection with geography.  As does this sentence:

Language and thought are not strictly coterminous.

Now here are a couple of sentences which are about geography:

1. The Guidelines emphasize the importance of coterminous boundaries for agencies working in partnership.

2. Australia is the only country that is coterminous with a continent.

shutterstock_119957359

If you would like to check out more interesting words. then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Bellicose

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to it as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

bellicose

Word: Bellicose

Part of Speech: Adjective

(Adverb: Bellicosely.  Noun: Bellicosity)

 Pronunciation: bel – i – kohs  (bel.ɪ.kəʊs)

 Meaning: 

Demonstrating aggression and willingness to fight.

Synonyms:

aggressive, hostile, threatening, antagonastic, trucculent, confrontational, argumentative, pugnacious, quarrelsome, belligerent, militant, combatative

British informal: stroppy, bolshie

N. American informal: strappy

Antonyms:

peaceable, non-aggressive, non-belligerent, incombatative, uncontentious 

Word Origin:  Late Middle English (1400 – 1450) from the Latin bellicosus (from bellum, meaning pertaining to war).

Use in a sentence: 

1. The fans had their say again and attitudes were conversational rather than bellicose and confrontational.

2. The warrior’s words were strident and bellicose.

shutterstock_115210036

If you would like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Androgynous

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to your post as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

androgynous

Word: Androgynous

Part of Speech:  Adjective

(Adverb:  Androgynously.  Noun: Androgyny )

 Pronunciation:  an-drog-y-nous  (an-droj’e-nes;  ænˈdrɒdʒ ə nəs)

 Meaning:

1. being both male and female; hermaphroditic.

2. having both masculine and feminine characteristics.

3. having an ambiguous sexual identity.

4. neither clearly masculine nor clearly feminine in appearance:

5. (biology) an individual animal or flower that has both male and female reproductive organs

Synonyms:  

cross-sexual, bisexual, unisexual, epicine, hermaphroditic

Antonyms:

 gendered 

(near antonyms: masculine, feminine)

Word Origin:  

Early 17th century from the Latin androgynus and the Greek androgynos

Use in a sentence: 

1. Rockin’ Reggie had the androgynous look of many rock stars.

2. He was a stunningly adgrogynous dancer.

Androgynous is an interesting word. I can appreciate how well it could be used in Sci-Fi novels and such like, to describe genderless beings.

In botany, androgynous is sometimes used instead of one of its synonyms, hermaphroditic. Examples of plants bearing both male and female reproductve organs include trees like birch, walnut oak and chestnut. The common plant, cuckoo pint, is often chosen as an example of a an androgynous flowering plant.  Here are a couple of pictures of it:

800px-Arum_maculatum_fluy_80_05052007_4
Cuckoo Pint (Arum maculatum) before flowering. Oliver Pichard: Creative Commons
Arum_maculatum9
Cuckoo Pint (Arum maculatum) bearing fruits. Jeffdelange: Creative Commons

If you would like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word Of The Week (WOW) – Perspicacious

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to your post as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

perspicacious

Word: Perspicacious

Part of Speech: Adjective

(Adverb: Perspicaciously; Noun: Perspicaciousness)

Pronunciation: Per-spi –ca -cious (pur – spi -key – shuhs)

Meaning:   Acutely insightful or wise.

Quick in noticing, understanding or judging things accurately

Synonyms:

Perceptive, aware, sharp, keen, acute, alert, penetrating, shrewd, discerning, astute, observant, clear-sighted, percipient, sharp-witted, sagacious

Antonyms:

dull, stupid

Word Origin: 1630’s, formed as an adjective to the Latin perspicax, from perspicere: sharp sighted, having the power to see through

Use in a sentence: 

1. The lawyer was much too perspicacious to be taken in by the spurious document.

2. The event offered a number of interesting facts to the perspicacious reporter.

I rather like this word.  It adds a little more interest to a sentence than just saying smart or sharp, or even wise – in the right setting of course. It wouldn’t suit on every occasion.

If you want to check out more words like this, then visit Heena’s page: Word Treasure.

Have a fun day.