Weekly Word – Innovative

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter I:

innovative

Meaning:

A product or idea featuring new, advanced and original methods; a person introducing new creative and original ideas in thinking; introducing innovations

Pronunciation:

in-uh-vey-tiv   (ɪn əˌveɪ tɪv)

Audio Link:

innovative

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

innovatively (adverb)

innovativeness (noun)

Synonyms:

original innovatory (British English) innovational new cutting-edge novel fresh unconventional unorthodox unusual unfamiliar unprecedented avant-garde experimental inventive ingenious advanced modern modernistic ultra-modern state-of-the-art futuristic pioneering groundbreaking trailblazing revolutionary radical

Antonyms: 

uncreative unimaginative uninventive unoriginal

Word Origin:

Late Middle English (1600-1610) from the Latin innovation, from the verb innovare

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. Despite being a hot-headed, violent man, often in trouble with the law and implicated in more than one murder, Caravaggio created striking, innovative paintings and pioneered the use of dramatic lighting and the representation of religious figures in modern clothes and attitudes.

The_Beheading_of_Saint_John-Caravaggio_(1608)
The Beheading of Saint John the Baptist by Caravaggio, 1608. Current location: St. John’s Co-Cathedral, Valetta, Malta. Public Domain

2. Miss Reynolds stood before the class of sixteen-year-olds, her steely gaze reminding them she did not tolerate inattention. ‘Now,’ she started, adjusting her dark-rimmed spectacles, ‘last lesson we watched a short film about the many ways in which plastic pollution is affecting our oceans. So today you will work in groups to create a convincing presentation on how any one of those problems could be dealt with and, where possible, offer alternative materials that could be used in the place of those causing the problems. Credit will be given for innovative ideas and on how innovatively you present them.

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Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

3 The new company in town was known not only for its excellent working conditions and pension schemes for employees, but for the many opportunities for promotion it offered to those who showed innovativeness and flair.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Hubris

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter H:

hubris

Meaning:

Excessive pride or foolish amount of self-confidence in one’s own abilities; a way of talking or behaving that is too proud and offends people.

Pronunciation:

hyoo-bris (hoo-bris)

Audio Link:

Hubris

Part of Speech:

Noun

Synonyms:

Arrogance, conceit, conceitedness, haughtiness, pride, nerve, vanity, self-importance, self-conceit, ostentation, pomposity, insolence, superciliousness, hauteur, big-headedness, boastfulness, pretension, pretentiousness, audacity, chuzpah, disdain.

Antonyms: 

Modesty, unselfishness, bashfulness, shyness, humility, self doubt, self loathing, altruism

Related Forms:

Hubristic (adjective)

Word Origin:

First recorded in 1880–85, HUBRIS is from the Greek word hýbris, meaning insolence.

(In Greek tragedy HUBRIS means excessive pride towards, or in defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis/punishment.)

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. From his seat in the clouds, Apollo focused on the young Trojan prince as he drew back his bow. Not renowned for his archery skills, Paris would not feel confident of his arrow finding its mark. But Apollo would ensure that the arrow flew straight to Achilles’ heel – the only vulnerable spot on the seemingly invincible Greek’s body. Achilles had greatly angered the gods with his pride and defiance and would pay dearly for his hubris.

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Image by Oberholster Venita from Pixabay

2. The conductor put down his baton and nodded approvingly at the end of the orchestra’s rehearsal. The new violinist was not only extremely talented, she lacked the hubristic behaviour common to many musicians he’d employed in the past.

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Image by S. Hermann & F. Richter from Pixabay

3. After putting up with her friend’s haughty and conceited ways since their schooldays, Erin suddenly flipped. ‘I’ve had it with you, Gloria. I’m sick of defending your pomposity to everyone. And believe me, once I stop lying through my teeth and telling them all how nice you are beneath that arrogant veneer, you won’t have a friend left in this town.’ She stood to leave. ‘And you know what…? From now on, you won’t even have me. Find another stooge to put up with your ridiculous hubris.’

shutterstock_657710485

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Gobbledegook

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter G:

gobbledegook

or…

gobbledygook

The two spellings seem to be used in both the UK and the US, but the most used spelling seems to be the second one (whereas I have always used the first).

Meaning:

1.  Complicated or technical language that is difficult to understand, especially when used in official documents or instruction manuals.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

2.  Although Meaning (1) above still remains in use, gobbledegook is sometimes used to mean simply nonsensical or silly (i.e. not necessarily jargon or pretentious wording):

Parents watched as the children played their party games, their happy chatter sounding like gobbledegook to adult ears.

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Pronunciation:

gobuhl-dee-gook

Audio Link:

Gobbledegook

Part of Speech:

Noun (Informal)

Synonyms:

nonsense, babble, balderdash, boloney, drivel, poppycock, mumbo jumbo, twaddle, gibberish, claptrap

Antonyms: 

fact, frankness, honesty, openness, sense, truth, truthfulness

Related Forms:

None

Word Origin:

1940s (originally US): probably imitating a turkey’s gobble.

Texas Congressman Maury Maverick coined the word in 1944 to describe the frustrating jargon used by policymakers in Washington. It reminded him of the sound of turkeys gobbling.

turkey-1456681_1280

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. ‘Okay, I’ve heard enough,’ Greg said none too politely, cutting through the salesman’s jargon. ‘Forget the rest of the gobbledegook and just tell me how much the car costs.’

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2. After listening to the closing speeches at the end of the trial, Monica’s head was spinning. Sifting the truth from the deluge of what sounded like gobbledegook spouted by witnesses and judges alike would not be an easy matter. shutterstock_1513707167

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Frowsty

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter F:

frowsty

Meaning:

British:

(Of a room): having a stale, warm, and stuffy atmosphere, often with an unpleasant smell due to the lack of fresh air

(Of a person or item):  having a slovenly or uncared-for appearance

Pronunciation:

frou-stee  ((frausti)

Audio Link:

Frowsty

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Synonyms:

stuffy musty airless unventilated fusty close muggy stifling suffocating oppressive stale stagnant smelly fetid malodorous rank damp acrid

Antonyms: 

airy ventilated

Related Forms:

Frowstier (comparative adjective)

Frowstiest (superlative asjective)

Other words from Frowsty:

Frowstily (adverb)

Frowstiness (noun)

Word Origin:

British

First recorded in 1860–65; perhaps dialectal variant of frowzy (of unknown origin)

Use the Word in a Sentence: 

1. Mary couldn’t understand how her sophisticated mother could enjoy the company of a gaggle of frowsty old women who spent their afternoons in an even frowstier old bingo hall.

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2. Doctor Simons caught his breath as he followed the old man into his home. An overpowering stench of sickness filled the frowsty, overly warm room and his first impulse was to throw back the shutters to allow the fresh air to circulate.

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3. The frowstiness of the air inside the derelict brewery told of years of it being locked and barred from the outside world.

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***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Equanimity

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter E:

equanimity

Meaning:

A calm mental state, especially after a shock or disappointment or in a difficult situation; emotional stability or composure so that you never lose your temper or become upset

Pronunciation:

e-kwuhnim-i-tee

Audio Link:

Equanimity

Part of Speech:

Noun

Synonyms:

Calm, calmness, composure, cool, poise, sangfoid, self-possession self-control, aplomb, placidity, balance

Antonyms: 

Discomposure, anxiety, frustration, doubt, excitableness, alarm, agitation

Related Forms:

Equanimous (adjective)

Word Origin:

Early 17th century (1600-10) from the Latin aequanimitas – which is equivalent to aequ(us), meaning even, plain, equal + anim(us) meaning ‘mind’, spirit, feeling.

Use the Word in a Sentence:

1. Sitting out here, gazing across this beautiful lake, was the only way that Mike could restore his equanimity after his latest row with his wife. How sad to think that their once loving and equanimous relationship had turned so sour.

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Image by 畅 苏 from Pixabay

2. Our neighbour was such a kind old man who always exuded an air of equanimity:

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Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay 

3. No matter how tense or stressed Janet felt after a hard day at the office, a session of yoga was enough to ensure that her equanimity soon returned.

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Image by 3333873 from Pixabay

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose(even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Weekly Word – Disingenuous

Weekly Word is a weekly post intended to illustrate the meaning and use of a single word. The chosen word will begin with a different letter of the alphabet each week, as Louise (my daughter) and I work our way through the alphabet.

Louise posts on her website:

An Enchanted Place

This week’s word begins with the letter D:

Meaning:

(Of a person or their behaviour):

Not totally honest, frank or sincere;  not speaking the complete truth.

Pretending to know less about something than one actually does; falsely or hypocritically ingenuous (i.e. honest, sincere and trusting, sometimes in a way that seems childlike and naive).

 Pronunciation:

dis-in-jen-yoo-uh s

Audio Link:

disingenuous

Part of Speech:

Adjective

Related Forms:

disingenuously (adverb)

disingenuousness  (noun)

Synonyms:

dishonest, deceitful, underhand, duplicitous, double-dealing, two-faced, dissembling, insincere, false, lying, untruthful, mendacious, artful, cunning, scheming, double-faced

Antonyms:

ingenuous, frank, artless, candid, open, sincere, trustworthy, upright, honourable

Word Origin

First recorded in 1645–55 dis + ingenuous

Use the Word in a Sentence (or two):

1. Having been hurt too many times by Enrico’s philandering ways, Maria had no intention of being influenced by his disingenuous compliments and attempts to win her back. She would simply smile sweetly and send him on his way.

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2. The disingenuousness of the newest recruit to their company was evident to several of the board members but, unfortunately, they had been outvoted.

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3. ‘Our new business will use only eco-friendly technology and provide employment for many of the local workforce…’ The three colleagues listened to the disingenuously delivered spiel before standing and leaving the guy to clear up his gear and see himself out.

austin-distel-wD1LRb9OeEo-unsplash

***

If you would like to join us in doing this weekly post, both Louise and I would be happy to see you. You can pick of your own word and illustrate its use in any way you choose (even a short story) or use your chosen word to follow a similar pattern to our posts.

shutterstock_558169333
Image  from Shutterstock

Word of Week (WOW) – Yammer

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter Y this week and, as with X, I’ve had limited choice for this week’s word – and I imagine Z will be just as bad. I can’t wait to get back to starting the alphabet again.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

yammer

Word: 

yammer

Pronunciation:

yam•mer (ˈyæm ər)

Audio link:

yammer

Part of Speech: 

verb

Related Forms:

noun: yammer; yam·mer·er 

adverb: yammeringly

Meaning:

As a verb:

1. to utter or whine in a complaining or peevish manner

2. to make a complaint, loudly or persistently:  shutterstock_187060769

3. (intransitive) esp of an animal, to howl or wail plaintively or distressingly; yelp or yowl.

As a noun:

  1. yammer e.g. The yammer of animated conversation emanated from the boardroom:
exchange-of-ideas-222788_640
Image courtesy of Pixabay

2. a yammering sound, wail, or utterance

3. nonsense; jabber

Synonyms:

beef, bellyache, bitch, bleat, carp, caterwaul, croak, fuss, gripe, grizzle, grouch, grouse, growl, grumble, grump, holler, keen, moan, murmur, mutter, nag, repine, scream, squawk, squeal, wail, whimper, whinge, whine, complain, yawp/yaup, yowl.

Antonyms: 

crow, delight, rejoice

Word Origin:

Middle English yameren, alteration of yomeren -to murmur, be sad – from Old English gēomrian -akin to Old High German  jāmaron, to be sad.  First known use: 15th century

Use in a Sentence:

1. After the earthquake, the seismographs yammered for days:

shutterstock_128742788

2. Maria escorted the old lady back to her house, smiling patiently as she yammered on about the old days:

Old_woman_walk

3. Chris yawned, willing the teacher to stop yammering about boring algebraic equations:

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4.  Left alone in the isolated cottage, Judith found the constant yammer of the guard dog quite unnerving:

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of Week (WOW) – Xenolith

wow (1)

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m up to the letter this week and this one was a bit of a challenge. There are relatively few words beginning with X, and many of the words that do either refer to something biological, botanical, or chemical, or are names of people or places. I ended up picking a noun that is familiar to me, and I want to attempt a couple of sentences using it in a metaphorical way, or perhaps in a simile.

So, here is my WOW for this week:

xenolith

Word: 

xenolith

Part of Speech: 

noun

Related Forms:

xenolithic: adjective

Pronunciation

xen·o·lith  (zěn’ə-lĭth’, zē’nə-)  

Audio link:

xenolinth

Meaning:

(Geological Sceience) a fragment of rock differing in origin, composition, structure, etc, from the igneous rock enclosing it.

Included fragment of granite within basalt. Near Georgeville, Nova Scotia. Rygel M.C. Commons
Included fragment of granite within basalt. Near Georgeville, Nova Scotia. Rygel M.C. Commons

Synonyms:

inclusion

Antonyms: 

None

Word Origin:

1894 – 1905; xeno (foreign, strange) + lith (stone)

Use in a Sentence:

1. (Adjective use) The xenolithic nature of the rock gave it an exotic appeal:

Garnet_lherzolite_-_xenolith_from_a_kimberlite_pipe,_Kimberley_SA
Garnet Iherzolite xenolith from Kimberley, South Africa. (Garnet – purplish-red, olivine – dark green, chromian dioxide pyroxene – bright green). Author: James St, John, uploaded by Tillman. Commons.

2. Against the dull grey of the lava flow, the xenolith of yellow peridotite stood out like the moon in the darkening night sky:

1024px-Nephelinit
‘Nephelinit’ by Benutzer Derhammer. Rounded, yellow, weathered peridotite xenolith in nephelinite lava flow. Kaiserstuhl, SW Germany. Commons

3. The moon was a xenolith in the indigo sky of night:

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4. The small girl in the purple dress was like a xenolith in the vast green meadow:

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Last two images courtesy of Pixabay.

If you’d like to see more interesting words visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Ethereal

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to it as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

ethereal

Word: Ethereal

Part of Speech:  Adjective

(Adverb: ethereally.  Noun: ethereality; etherealness)

 Pronunciation:  e – the – re -al     (ih – theer – ee – uh – l)

 Meaning:

1. Extremely light or delicate, especially in  an unnatural way; refined

2. Of the celestial spheres; heavenly

3. Relating to, containing, or resembling a chemical ether

Synonyms:  

1. ghostly, vaporous, wraithlike, waiflike, bodiless, fragile, frail, intangible, immaterial, incorporeal, diaphonous, non-physical

2. spiritual, sublime, divine, holy, Elysian, unearthly, otherworldly

Antonyms:

Substantial, earthly, worldy, corporeal, concrete, tangible, material

Word Origin:   

First documented use in English 1505-15 >  Latin aethere (us) > Greek aithérios 

Use in a sentence: 

1. Sarah gazed at the ethereal wings of a dragonfly.

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2. Beyond the stars is the ethereal realm of the divine. (As in fantasy, mythology etc.)

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3. Deborah was small, fair and ethereal.

4. The stained-glass windows gave the church an ethereal glow

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Note. This word is not to be confused with ephemeral, which means transitory or short- lived – like a mayfly. I like both words and the ways in which they can be used.

  If you would like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure

Word of the Week (WOW) – Duplicity

wow

Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week.

To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link to as a comment on Heena’s WOW post.

Here is my WOW for this week:

duplicity

Word: Duplicity

Part of Speech:  Noun

Adjective: duplicitous

Plural: duplicities

Nearby Words:

duplicate, duplicating, duplication, duplicator,duplicature, duplicatus

 Pronunciation:

UK: due-plic-i-tee (dyu-plic-i-tee)

US: du-plic-i-ty (doo-plic-i-tee)

 Meaning:

1. Deliberate deceptiveness in behaviour or speech (especially by saying different things to two people).

2. An instance of deliberate deceptiveness; double dealing

3. The quality or state of being twofold or double

Synonyms:  

cunning, deceit, deceitfulness, deception, double-dealing, guile, shiftiness, dissimulation, fraud, hypocrisy

Antonyms:

candidness, directness, honesty, straightforwardness

Word Origin:  

1400-50 Late Middle English fron the Middle French duplicite. The roots of the word can be found in the Late Latin word, duplicatas and duplex.  The most common sense of duplicity today is deceitfulnessThe roots of this meaning can be found in the initial  ‘dupl’ – from the Latin duplex, meaning twofold, or double.

Use in a sentence: 

1. Martha was not a woman for compromise or duplicity.

2. The salesman was not averse to a little duplicity in his dealings with customers.

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I particularly like the adjective of this word: duplicitous. I have a few duplicitous characters in my books. I also use the word perfidious, which can also be a synonym of duplicitous (but has other meanings as well, including unfaithful and treasonous). To me, both duplicitous and perfidious sound so much more interesting than just saying deceitful.

 *

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If you would like to check out more interesting words then visit Heena’s page:

Word Treasure