The Promise of May (May 3)

When we first moved to the village in which we’ve lived for the past ten years, people who didn’t know me called me ‘the lady who walks’. Well, I don’t mind being labelled as such because, quite honestly, it suits me.  I do walk a lot, simply because I can’t bear being cooped up indoors. There’s so much to see out there, and every day is different; every month even more so. Besides, it keeps me fit and, hopefully, young. (Fat chance of that considering that I had my 70th birthday last month. Notice I didn’t say celebrated my birthday! How is getting old something to celebrate? 😦 On the other hand, I got some seriously nice prezzies).

And now it’s May, and the rest of spring has still to unfold before the summer ahead. So what does the onset of May bring to mind for you? This will obviously depend on which part of the world you live in and which season you’re about to embark upon. Here in the UK, it’s SPRING! Glorious Spring… the month of promise.

These are some of the photos I’ve taken over the first few days of May. They are of our garden and from around and about the village:

The photos of the sparrowhawk were taken two days ago through the glass of our conservatory, so apologies for the fuzzy look. He was gorging himself on a blackbird when we spotted him, and if we’d opened a door or window he would have rapidly skidaddled.

As for returning migratory birds, our house martins returned to their usual nesting place beneath our eaves a few weeks ago…

… and there are plenty of swallows about. But I haven’t yet heard a cuckoo, and often they arrive before the end of April. (In May and June they sing their tune.) I expect to hear the familiar call any day now. I wrote about the egg-laying habits of the cuckoo last year, here.

What else does May bring to mind?

For me, May will always make me think of Robin of Sherwood, the TV series filmed in the ’80s. To me and our two daughters, it was the best Robin Hood production ever. Michael Praed and Judi Trott were wonderful as Robin and Marion and the rest of the cast were also superb. The series was made even more poignant by the awesome music of Clannad.

Here’s a short YouTube clip of the first time Robin set eyes on Marion:

Did you spot the line… You’re like a May morning?  Marion’s youthfulness fits perfectly with the idea of freshness and beginnings. This is the rest of the little bit of dialogue, which seems to have been cut from that video version:

Robin: You’re like a May morning. Stay here in Sherwood and be my May Queen.
Marion: In Sherwood? And be your May queen? But what will I be when winter comes?
Robin: I’d build a fire at the cave’s mouth, wrap you in sheepskin, and hold you close.

More snippets about May…

  • May was named after the Greek goddess Maia. It was a time of great celebration in the northern hemisphere; the time when flowers and crops emerged. Before 1430, May was called Maius. Meyes or Mai.
  •  The Anglo-Saxon name for May was Tri-Milchi, which referred to the new lush grasses that allowed milking of cows to be three times a day.
  • On the 1st of May in days long past, young girls would rush out and wash their faces in dew. It was thought that May dew had magical properties: anyone who washed their face in it would have a beautiful complexion all year round. It also removed freckles, spots and pimples. (Sounds like good stuff!)
  • People born in May are said to be loving and practical
  •  The zodiac signs for May are Taurus until May 20 and Gemini from May 21 onwards.
  • May’s birthstone is the emerald (emblematic of love and success) and also chrysophase in the UK.
  • In the U.S. and in many countries around the world, Mother’s Day in is May (May 14 this year, I believe). In the U.K. we celebrate that day in March.
  • May 1st is May Day in many countries and celebrated in a variety of ways, which I wrote about here. The day is also International Workers Day worldwide.

And here are some well known quotes about May:

  1. Among the changing months, May stands confest The sweetest, and in fairest colors dressed.  – James Thomso
  2. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May – William Shakespeare
  3. Sweet April showers do spring May flowers – Thomas Tusser

To finish with, here’s a video of an old song, Now is the Month of Maying, written by Thomas Morely in 1595. It has been recorded by a number of choirs and singing groups and this one was uploaded to YouTube by Ana Pachero. It features The Kings Singers.

And now, after three posts about it, I’ll leave May alone and have a think about my next post about Cornwall.