Picture It and Write – Druid Path

Here is my contribution to this week’s Picture It and Write Challenge. This is a weekly writing challenge, posted every Sunday, by the author of Ermiliablog. The challenge is to write a piece of fiction or a poem in response to the photo prompt given. I’m rather late with this one, as the next one will be out tomorrow!

Here is this week’s photo prompt . . .

tumblr_nfo8bfz2kd1r51oypo8_1280 (1)…. and here is my piece of fiction:

In the sombre grey light before sunrise, the column of white-clad priests moved along the leaf-strewn path in respectful silence. Behind his father at the head of the train, Gueiridd kept his hooded head bowed, focusing on the swirling mists enveloping his feet. Passing through each elaborately twisted spiral of willow, he feared his tormented screams would erupt. For like the great stone circles of his forbears, the spirals symbolized the all-powerful Sun-god, the source of all beings.

Gueiridd dared not glance behind, could not watch his beloved being dragged to her fate. Her only crime was that of loving him; loving the son of the merciless Arch Druid, Morcar. Once they reached the sacred grove, Brietta would be sacrificed to the Sun-god.

Chanting now, the column streamed through the ring of ancient oaks to a clearing within, slowly circling the granite altar at its centre. As Brietta was laid upon it, the Sun-god rose from the Otherworld, casting golden rays through the sacred grove.

Morcar raised the sacrificial knife…

‘No . . .’ Restraint abandoned, Gueiridd hurled himself at his father. Prepared for this likelihood, two dagger-wielding priests leapt to restrain him. Gueiridd’s howl rang through the grove as Morcar plunged the sacrificial blade deep into Brietta’s chest.

The thought that he would be next came as relief to Gueiridd. He would meet his Brietta in the next life. And the Sun-god would be doubly appeased this day.

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25 thoughts on “Picture It and Write – Druid Path

    1. As you will know (!) Alexander, the Druids firmly believed in reincarnation. I’m not praticularly ‘well up’ on their practices, but I think I’m right about that. I’m glad you liked the ending of this one, anyway!

    1. Thank you, Ali. As for the ending – I thought about having them escape but that would have involved quite a few more words.I think it was quite long enough (meaning, too long) as it was!

    1. Well, I definitely enjoyed writing this story better than more modern ones. I’m quite fascinated by the Druids and their beliefs.The sacrifices were a bit gruesome, though! Thank you for liking it, Betty.

    1. I’m glad you liked it, John. That type of subject is definitely for me. I’m well and truly stuck in the past! Can’t see me ever catching up with the present century.

    1. You’re the second one to wish they could have run away. I agree, it would have been so nice. But the story would probably have been twice as long! Never mind, they’ll meet again in the next life. Thank you, Rachael.

      1. Well, perhaps when (if!) I decide to write a novel based on that little piece of writing, I’ll think of you when I do that part. Escape sounds good to me, too. 🙂

    1. What then, indeed. I think that’s anyone’s guess at the moment – or should I say, it’s open to interpretation? Thank you for the lovely comment, Joycelin. I could make a whole novel out of this, I suppose – starting off with all the back story leading up to the sacrifice. Now, there’s a thought . . .
      Hope you and the boys are all well. (We have the funeral tomorrow. Four weeks has been a long wait.)

      1. I’m in Southport now – just got here half an hour ago. The funeral is in the morning, so tomorrow will be an upsetting day. Be back home Tuesday sometime. Thank you so much for your best wishes, Joycelin. It’s good to know you’re all well. I hope the barbecue building goes well. 🙂

  1. There’s a touch of Romeo and Juliet about this story. Such dedication to one’s love makes for a great story concept. I really admire the way you can do it all so succinctly. Always a delight to read your fiction

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