WInter Solstice Celebrations Through Time

Winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere over Asia

The word solstice comes from the Latin word, solstitium, which means ‘Sun standing still’. The December solstice is the day on which the Sun is at its most southerly point, directly overhead at the Tropic of Capricorn, before it reverses its direction and gradually starts to move north again.  The image above shows the winter solstice in the Northen Hemisphere over Asia.  (Author: Jecowa at English Wikipedia. Creative Commons).

To people in the Northern Hemisphere the winter solstice means the longest night, with the latest dawn and shortest day of the year, with the sun at its lowest point in the sky. The day after the winter solstice marks the beginning of lengthening days, as we head towards the summer solstice on June 21st 2016.

For those in the Southern Hemisphere the opposite is true: people will experience the shortest night and the earliest dawn, with the longest day and the sun at its highest point in the sky.

The December solstice happens at the same time everywhere on Earth. This year it is on Tuesday, December 22nd (today!) at 04:49 GMT/Universal time. At Stonehenge, in Wiltshire, UK, the sun rose this morning at 08:04. The time is different every year, and can be between December 20th and 23rd, although it’s rarely on the two extremes.  The last time it was on December 23rd was in 1903, which will not happen again until 2303.

Interpretations of the winter solstice have varied worldwide and across cultures, but many have involved the recognition of  the rebirth of sunlight after the darkest time of year. As such, it has been celebrated with holidays, gatherings, festivals and rituals around that time. Many of these celebrations have been observed since the earliest times.

The prehistoric monument of Stonehenge in Wiltshire, UK (constructed  from 3000-2000 BC) is aligned on a sight-line that points to the winter solstice sunset . . . 

Sunrise between the stones at Stonehenge on the winter solstice. Author: Mark Grant. Creative Commons.
Sunrise between the stones at Stonehenge on the winter solstice. Author: Mark Grant. Creative Commons.

. . . in comparison to the Newgrange prehistoric monument in County Meath, Ireland, which points to the winter solstice sunrise:

Newgrange prehistoric monument, County Meath, Ireland. Author: Shira. Creative Commons
Newgrange prehistoric monument, County Meath, Ireland. Author: Shira. Creative Commons

Then there is the Goseck circle in Germany, which is aligned to both sunset and sunrise:

Neolithic site of the Goseck circle. The yellow lines are the direction the Sun rises and sets at winter solstice. Author: de:Benutzer:Rainer Zenz, Public Domain
Neolithic site of the Goseck circle. The yellow lines are the direction the Sun rises and sets at winter solstice. Author: de:Benutzer:Rainer Zenz, Public Domain

It is believed that the winter solstice was more important to the people who constructed Stonehenge than the summer solstice. The winter solstice was a time when cattle were slaughtered, so they would not have to be fed throughout the winter, and most of the wine and beer was finally fermented by then, and could be enjoyed.

In ancient Rome, the winter solstice was celebrated with a festival called Saturnalia. This began on December 17th and lasted for seven days. Saturnalian banquets were held as far back as 217 BCE to honour Saturn, the father of the gods. It began with  a sacrifice at the Temple of Saturn in the Roman forum, followed by a public banquet, a private gift giving and continuous partying!

The carnival overturned Roman social norms, being more like a free-for-all, when all discipline and orderly behaviour was ignored; colourful clothes replaced the formal togas. Wars were interrupted or postponed, gambling was permitted and slaves were served by their masters. All grudges and quarrels were forgotten (but were they suddenly remembered again afterwards, I ask?).

Dice players on a wall in Pompeii. Author: WolfgangRieger. Public Domain
Dice players on a wall in Pompeii. Author: WolfgangRieger. Public Domain

At the gift giving (December 19th) it was traditional to offer gifts of imitation fruit – a symbol of fertility. Dolls were given, which were symbolic of human sacrifice, and so were candles – a reminder of the bonfires associated with pagan solstice celebrations. The whole festival would become a week-long orgy of debauchery and crime:

Saturnalia sculpture by Ernesto Biondi: a bronze copy n the Botanical Gardens in Buenos Aires. (Original in the National Gallery of Modern art in Rome). Uploaded by Roberto Fiadone. Creative Commons
Saturnalia sculpture by Ernesto Biondi: a bronze copy n the Botanical Gardens in Buenos Aires. (Original in the National Gallery of Modern art in Rome). Uploaded by Roberto Fiadone. Creative Commons

In the Norse lands of pre-Christian Scandinavia, the winter solstice was celebrated with the feast of Jul (or jól), from which we get the terms Yule and Yuletide. Yule is what later evolved into today’s Christmas, though the Danes still call it Jul. The Danish Vikings sacrificed and offered up goods and animals to the gods in order to conquer the darkness of winter. Then they drank a toast for the year and for peace. The toast was very important and a beaker of beer was offered to the gods. Then the people would toast and drink and thank each other and the gods for the past year and welcome in the new.

People would light fires to symbolise the heat and light of the returning sun and a Jul /Yule log was brought in and dropped in the hearth as a tribute the god Thor. The Yule log was often an entire tree, carefully chosen and brought into the house with great ceremony and sometimes, the largest end of the log would be placed into the fire hearth, while the rest of the tree stuck out into the room.

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Image from Shutterstock

I wrote a short post about the Yule log last December, with a brief paragraph from Shadow of the Raven describing the Yule celebrations. It can be found here.

The log would be lit from the remains of the previous year’s log which had been stored away and, later on, in Christian times, was often fed into the fire through the Twelve Days of Christmas. The log was burned until nothing but ash remained, then the ashes were collected and either strewn on the fields as fertiliser every night until Twelfth Night or kept as a charm and or as medicine. A piece of the log was kept as both a token of good luck and as kindling for the following year’s log.

These are just three of the ways in which peoples of the past celebrated the winter solstice. There are many others from different times and cultures, but I can’t do them all. There’s only a couple of hours left of December 22nd, 2015, here in the UK, so the shortest day has almost been and gone . . .

All I can say is that it was incredibly short!

They’re All The Rage – Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers

Flash Fiction for for Aspiring Writers is a writing challenge hosted by Priceless Joy. It asks us to write a piece of fiction from the photo prompt provided in around 100-150 words – give or take 25 words. It encourages us to comment, constructively, on other entries, so supporting each other’s writing. If you’d like to join in with this challenge, follow the above link to see what to do. The challenge runs from Tuesday to Tuesday every week.

It’s been a couple of months since I participated in a flash fiction challenge, but this prompt brought two different stories to mind, so I decided to have a go at one of them. Unsurprisingly, this one has a historical slant.

This is the prompt, kindly provided by Priceless Joy. Image courtesy of Pixabay . . .

photo-20151214095129364. . . and this is my story:

They’re All The Rage!

Lady Penelope withdrew her hand from the marmalade pot and gaped at the grinning sixteen-year-old across the breakfast table. Her husband, Lord Geoffrey Troughton, engrossed in reading the morning news, showed no signs of having heard their son’s request.

‘What on earth do you mean Archie?’ she demanded. ‘I’ve no idea what a ‘Penny Farthing’ is, let alone where to buy you one for Christmas.’

Archie let out an exasperated sigh. ‘Surely you’ve heard of them, Mother . . . everyone’s talking about them. They’re really quite the rage.  All the chaps at school are getting them for Christmas, and I’d like one, too.’

Lord Troughton lowered his newspaper. ‘It’s another of those bicycle machines, my dear,’ he explained. ‘It has a large wheel at the front and the smaller one at the back, reminiscent of the different sized coins, the penny and the farthing. They’re remarkably fast, Archie – just right for the modern age . . .’

Penelope went back to eating her toast. She’d have no further say in the matter now.

Word Count: 175

Penny Farthing, invented 1880-82. Courtesy of Pixabay
Penny Farthing, invented 1880-82. Image courtesy of Pixabay

If you’d like to read other entries, or add a story yourself, click on the little blue frog:

Christmassy Nottingham In The Rain!

Nottingham Council House (2)

On Saturday I went into Nottingham with my elder daughter, Nicola, and grandson Kieran, to do some Christmas shopping. We went on the train – just to keep my train-mad grandson happy – and were out all day, not getting home until the evening. As you can see from the photo above, it poured down for most of the day, so we did spend more time than we’d have liked mooching around inside the shops.

Nottingham is a big city with a history that goes back hundreds of years. It is known worldwide mostly for its connections with the Robin Hood stories, but there’s a lot more to Nottingham than that, and I’ll probably do a post about it sometime next year.

Robin Hood Memorial in Nottingham, near to the castle. Uploaded by Soerfm under GNU Free Documentation License. Wikimedia Commons.
Robin Hood Memorial in Nottingham, near to the castle. Uploaded by Soerfm under GNU Free Documentation License. Wikimedia Commons.

For now I’ll just share some of the photos I took of the Old Market Square, and give you a little bit of information about it:

In the days before the City of Nottingham existed as such, the area which is now the Market Square was the centre-point between two Anglo Saxon towns in the old kingdom of Mercia. One of these towns was Snotengaham (also called Snothryngham, Snottingaham and – the usual name around here – just Snottingham). Whichever name is used, it simply means ‘the settlement of Snot’s people’ – to most people’s amusement.  So the central area between these two settlements has been the centre of the city’s growth for hundreds of years.

The Old Market Square, as it is known, is an open, pedestrianised area, from which shopping streets spread out in all directions. It’s a place where friends can meet and do some shopping, or visit one of the many cafes, restaurants and pubs. It is the largest public space in the U.K. after Trafalgar Square in London and is a centre for Nottingham’s transport links. Trams run around the outer edge of the square, as can be see from the overhead lines in a photo of the Council House lower down the page. Unfortunately the only photo I took of a tram is not a good one, particularly as people stepped in front of me as I snapped it. Here it is anyway:

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In summer for several years now, a large area of the square has been converted into an artificial, sandy beach for parents to take their children to play on, with a huge paddling pool in the middle – an excellent idea for a ‘Midlands’ city, a long way from the coast. The square was also the original site for Nottingham’s famous Goose Fair, which originated over 700 years ago and is held every October. In 1928, the fair was moved for redevelopment of the square and is now held on the Forest Recreation Ground, an open space about a mile north of the city centre.

The Bell Inn, thought to be one of the UK’s oldest pubs and dating back to around 1276, can also be seen at the back of the square. I forgot to take a photo of it as we dodged the rain, so here’s a (summertime) photo from Wikipedia:

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Updated photo of the Bell Inn in Nottingham Market Square. Author: Lee J. Haywood. Creative Commons,

But the building that dominates the square, although undoubtedly impressive, is nowhere near as old as the Bell Inn. This is the Nottingham Council House building as seen on my ‘header’ image and this one below. It was built to replace two much older buildings that had been used for this purpose over the years – the old Norman ‘Moot Hall’ and the English Guildhall, last used in 1877.

Council House

This new Council House was designed by Nottinghamshire architect T. Cecil Howitt and a building called ‘The Exchange’ was demolished in 1926 to accommodate it. In 1929, thousands of people gathered to watch its official opening in by the Prince of Wales, who later became King Edward VIII, open the great doors with a golden key, which is still displayed on a wall plaque, just inside the building to the left of the grand staircase.

Unlike the Lincoln Christmas Market, held only over a long weekend, Nottingham’s is held throughout December. Like several others in the U.K. nowadays, it is also fashioned after the German markets, although Lincoln was the first in the country to do so. Still, it all looked very pretty, with a little fun fair and lit-up stalls – despite the rain.

Lincoln Christmas Market, however, has the great advantage of its wonderful setting in the castle bailey and being overlooked by the beautiful, towering medieval cathedral. It draws people back, year after year.

*****

The Mini-Barons Celebrate Christmas

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Throughout this summer the city of Lincoln celebrated the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta at Runneymede.  Only four copies of this ‘Great Charter’ are still in existence today: two in the British Library, one in Salisbury Cathedral and one that belongs to Lincoln Cathedral, but is on display in Lincoln Castle.

As part of the anniversary celebrations in Lincoln the organisers created a Barons’ Charter Trail for children to follow. Twenty five lifesized and colourful ‘barons’ were created and given names like ‘Truck Driver Baron’ and ‘Wild Flower Baron’. They were placed in prominent positions across the city centre and little ‘mini barons’ were produced for people to buy and decorate themselves.

I wrote a post about the Magna Carta, with pictures of the life-sized barons in August (here) but here is a picture of just three of them . . .

. .  and this one had changed his clothes to welcome people to the Christmas market over last weekend:

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In September the barons were brought together for one last ‘reunion’ in the castle grounds before they were auctioned off.  Since then, as part of the Christmas festivities in Lincoln, many shops and businesses have been given one of these mini barons to decorate and display in widows, or on check-out counters. Again, the challenge has been to see how many people can find them. Last week we went into ‘downhill Lincoln’ – the main shopping area – and photographed some of the barons we found:

On Friday evening, we went to Lincoln Christmas Market and had a look for a few more of these little barons in shops in the ‘uphill’ part of the city. These are some we found:

The Barons – both big and small – have been good for Lincoln. Along with the Magna Carta and the Sand Sculptures, they have brought many visitors and trade to the city. Last weekend the Christmas market added to the festive feel as 2015 draws to a close. I wonder what 2016 will bring . . .?

Shoe Baron Hearder

Word of Week (WOW) – Incorrigible

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Word of the Week (WOW) is a weekly challenge created by Heena Rathore P. It’s a fun way to improve vocabulary by learning new words every week. To participate, simply do a post with your word and leave the link as a comment on Heena’s WOW post for this week (above link).

I’m looking at the letter I this week: 

incorrigible

Word

Incorrigible

Pronunciation:

in·cor·ri·gi·ble   (ĭn-kôr′ĭ-jə-bəl)

Audio:

incorrigible

Part of Speech

Adjective

Related Forms:

Noun:  incorrigibility; incorrigibleness

Adverb. incorrigibly

Meaning:

  1. Bad beyond correction or reform; not corrigible (corrigible meaning capable of being corrected or reformed)

2.  Impervious to constraints or punishment; wilful; unruly; uncontrollable:

(e.g. William’s teachers said he was always fighting in the playground and was totally incorrigible.):

Image courtesy of Pixabay
Image courtesy of Pixabay

3.  firmly fixed; not easily changed

4.  not easily swayed or influenced

5.  (Noun) a person who is incorrigible

Word Origin:

Middle English: 1300-1350, from the Latin incorrigibilis – from in (not) corrigibilis

Synonyms:

incurable, irrecoverable, irredeemable, irreformable, unredeemable, depraved, hopeless, delinquent, unruly, unalterable, inveterate, disobedient, unreformed, hardened, intractable

Antonyms:

curable, reclaimable, recoverable, redeemable, reformable, remediable, retrievable, savable (or saveable) corrigible

Use in a Sentence:

1. From the time Helen had got out of bed this morning her incorrigible hair had refused to stay in any style suitable for a day showing prospective purchasers around the new apartments:

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2.  ‘You’re an incorrigible old rogue, Grandad’, Mark said, unable to suppress a smile as the ruddy faced old man sidled over to the drinks cabinet and poured himself another generous Scotch. ‘You know what the doctor said about easing off on the booze, at least until after the test results. Mum’d have a fit if she knew.’

Grandad just winked, and grinned incorrigibly. ‘But yer mum’ll not know about it, will she, lad?’

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3 After ten years of marriage to an incorrigible gambler, Alice had had enough: divorce was her only option:

A person playing at a gambling machine. Author: Jose Pereira. Creative Commons
A person playing at a gambling machine. Author: Jose Pereira. Creative Commons

*

I rather like this word, especially when used in a humorous and/or affectionate way, as in the second  ‘Use in a Sentence’ above.

If you’d like to view more interesting words, visit Heena’s Page

Word Treasure

The Lincoln Christmas Market 2015

Between Castle and Cathedral

Over the last weekend, the annual Christmas Market was held in Lincoln. As always, stalls stretched across a section of ‘uphill’ part of the city known as the cultural area – i.e. where the castle and cathedral are.  This area is, literally, ‘uphill’. Lincoln is a strangely shaped city: parts of it are at the top of the hill and some stretches out at the bottom. The slope in betweeen the two is quite steep, though it is built on, of course, and the main, narrow road leading from the main shopping area of lower Lincoln to the top of the hill is aptly called, Steep Hill.

Top of Steep Hill
Top of Steep Hill before it dips down towards the lower part of the city

This year, we decided to visit the market in the evening, when it feels the most atmospheric. Last year we had a daytime visit, simply so we could take photos. I’m glad we did, because this year, our photos haven’t turned out well at all. I’ll share a few on this post, but a better view of the stalls and goods on offer can be seen on my last year’s post here. (Oddly enough, I posted that one on December 7th last year.)

As I said last year, the Lincoln Christmas Market is one of the oldest in England and the first one to be ‘German-styled’. It started in 1982 following the ‘twinning of the city with Neustadt in Germany, with an initial eleven stalls standing between the cathedral and castle. These two pictures are the same German stall with the name Neustadt on it. The one on the left was taken this year, at night, and the other during the daytime last year:

Now stalls spread through the castle grounds and along some of the streets –

and the fun fair, along with more stalls, takes over nearby carparks:

At the main gateway into the castle grounds was this welcoming figure. One of the ‘Barons’ of Magna Carta fame from throughout the summer had taken on his new role:

The majority of stalls were inside the castle grounds, many the traditional chalet style, others beneath a number of marquees. There were many goods on offer, on stalls from several European countries as well as different areas of Britain. German stalls were prevalent, as to be expected due to the ‘twinning’. Many of them sold food and drinks of one type or another, both hot and cold.

Here are a few of the dozens of photos we took around the  market and castle grounds. Many were just too ‘glary’ due to the bright lights.

Well, that’s it for this year about the Lincoln Christmas Market. Now I need to think of a post about all the ‘mini barons’ that are hidden around the city. We’ve managed to find quite a few.

****

The Epic Awesomeness Award

awesome-award

I’ve been nominated for this unusual award by Charles French, who describes his blog as ‘an exploration of reading and writing‘. I can say that there are some excellent tips for writers on Charles’ site. Himself a writer, and someone who teaches writing skills, his expertise is passed on to readers through his many, varied posts. I recommend you all to take a look and see just how much Charles’ blog includes.

So, I’ll jump right into this one and list The RULES:

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1. You are awesome; tell us why.

2. You are my friend; tell us about other friends.

3. Be creative, but it’s ok if you are having trouble with this one.

4. There are no direct questions to answer; let yourself run wild!

5. Thank the blogger who nominated you.

6. Notify your nominees.

I could say, ‘Oooh, er . . . where do I start wih this one?’ So I’ll just do my usual thing and ramble . . .

Now I’m ready to dive . . . swimmer-304771_640

I think of high mountains as awesome. Some reach up into the sky, well beyond the clouds before tapering away to nothingness. Oceans are awesome: seemingly bottomless depths. Outer space is awesome: infinity beyond our wildest imaginings:

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The Aurora Borealis is awesome. Blue Whales are awesome.  Life itself is awesome . . .

I think you’ll have got what I’m saying by now. Some things are totally, gobsmackingly awesome!  According to the Oxford English Dictionary awesome means:

“Extremely impressive or daunting; inspiring awe”.

No doubt some people are awesome, too – usually those people (past or present) whose lives have/ have had some beneficial effect on many of us on this planet, or who gain our admiration for their skills and achievements. Those people could be anything from scientists and entrepreneurs to great composers, musicians, artists, writers or athletes etc. (This list could go on forever, so I’ll leave it at that!)

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Awesome Einstein

Well, I’m of the opinion that there are different ‘types’ of awesomeness. Outer space and people can’t be measured on the same scale. In the blogging community we nominate for awards people whose posts we love to read; posts that impress us. Awards have so many different names – like Creative, Versatile, or Very Inspiring Blogger – all qualities we recognise and appreciate in people we ‘follow’ and like. I’m really grateful for having been nominated for a few awards myself. It’s an honour to be included, even though many awards are time consuming to respond to. This one, at least, allows us to freely ramble!

As for being awesome …!!??!! Apart from anything else, I’m only 5’2” – hardly awesome in appearance. But Epic Awesomeness is a wonderful title for a blog award. On the scale we use in the blogging community, it means so much to have been nominated for this one. But I can only mimic what Charles, who nominated me, said in his post – I have never considered myself to be awesome. I do a lot of different kinds of posts, and I know that different ones appeal to different people. I tend to have different ‘likers’ when I do Travel or History posts to when I write Flash Fiction. That’s only to be expected. I’m interested in so many things – and have learned so much from reading some wonderful WordPress posts since becoming part of this community sixteen months ago

In our blogging world, we become ‘blogging friends’ with each other and enjoy each others’ posts. Blogging lets us chat with people in far off places and we come to ‘know’ them. At least we come to know what they’re interested in and how they feel about certain issues. Sometimes, it feels as though I’ve known some of my blogging friends personally for years. I could list so many people I talk to a lot – but that may be simply because I talk a lot anyway (once a teacher, always a teacher… haha.). Some of those people I’ve ‘known’ since before last Christmas, others only for a matter of weeks . . .

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There are so many lovely bloggers I’ve ‘met’ on WP. I wish I could say ‘hello’ properly to all of you (I’d bring a stool, so you wouldn’t need to keep looking down at me). For now, I’ll just have to be content with nominating people I think are awesome for this award.

I realise that some of you in the list may be too busy right now in the run up to Christmas. Others may well be ‘award free’ blogs. I’m just giving bloggers I like a mention. It would be great to see your posts, but if you don’t that’s OK too . . .

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Jack R Cotner

Aquileana at La Audacia de Aquiles

Bekki at Dartmoor Yarns

Draliman at dralimanonlife

Joy at Tales from Eneana

Amanda at Something to Ponder about

Joycelin at Tribalmysticstories

Dinata Misovec

Scrapydo

Chioma at lifehomeandaway

Leggy Peggy

Faraday’s Candle

Frances at Loving Leisure Time

Freda at Aromatic Essence

Lina at Lin’s recipes

Shivangi

Claremary P. Sweeney

Inese at Snapshot Perspectives

Susan at Susan’s Creative Writing and Poetry

Suzanne at puginakitchen

All Awesome People . . .!

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Quotes Challenge – Day 3

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I am happy to have once again been nominated to take part in the Quotes Challenge, this time by fellow blogger amommasview over there in Australia. Momma’s posts are always informative and thought-provoking, on topics as varied as health and fitness, kids and homeschooling and environmental issues – plus many more. It was Past Present and Future that Momma chose to do for her Quotes Challenge and for my three quotes I’ve decided to look at the theme of Friends and Friendship – something we all need in our lives.

One of my favourite friendship quotes is believed to come from William Shakespeare in a collection of poems called The Passionate Pilgrim. It isn’t one of the three quotes I’ve picked for the challenge because I’ve decided to write it here as a sort of introduction to the friendship theme instead. I believe that friendship is very important, and good friends can really enrich the quality of our daily lives. Well, this is Shakespeare’s quote:

“Words are easy, like the wind; faithful friends are hard to find.”

I don’t doubt the saying is true. We can all make ‘fairweather’ friends throughout our lives – those who are happy to be with us when the going is good. But when things get tough…? That’s when we find out who our real friends are.

This is my Friendship Quote for Day Three:

Second Friendship Quote

I think this quote makes a good discussion piece. I see it as meaning that it is better to go through difficult times with a friend – or friends – than through easy times alone and friendless. Friendlessness can so often mean loneliness – not something many people would willingly choose. Good friends will be there for each other, even when life gets tough or sadness strikes.

The rules for this challenge are simple:

  1. Post three different quotes on consecutive days. They can be from any source, or your own.  All three quotes can be of a similar theme (as I have chosen Friendship) or can all be completely different/unrelated.
  2. Nominate 3 people for the challenge. I have chosen to nominate 3 different people each day – making a total of 9 – but some people just nominate 3 altogether. It’s up to you.

These are my three nominees for today:

Leggy Peggy

Claremary P. Sweeney at Around Zu Zu’s Barn

Farraday’s Candle

As this is the last day of my Quotes Clallenge, I want to finish by offering one last ‘Friendship’ quote. I was reminded of this one a few weeks ago by Amanda, on her blog, Forestwoodfolkart. Every Thursday, Amanda posts a couple of proverbs for readers to interpret/discuss – some Scandinavian, others…well…not Scandinavian. 🙂 She has posted several by Confucius, and this is one of them. I did think of using it as one of my three, but it holds a slightly different meaning to the those I eventually picked. Well, with many thanks to Amanda and a link to her Proverbial Thursday post, here is the quote:

“It is more shameful to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them.”
― Confucius

Now this is a discussion piece, if ever I heard one. But I’ll leave you to ponder on it.

*****

Quotes Challenge – Day 2

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I am happy to have once again been nominated to take part in the Quotes Challenge, this time by fellow blogger amommasview over there in Australia. Momma’s posts are always informative and thought-provoking, on topics as varied as health and fitness, kids and homeschooling and environmental issues – plus many more. It was Past Present and Future that Momma chose to do for her Quotes Challenge and for my three quotes I’ve decided to look at the theme of Friends and Friendship – something we all need in our lives.

One of my favourite friendship quotes is believed to come from William Shakespeare in a collection of poems called The Passionate Pilgrim. It isn’t one of the three quotes I’ve picked for the challenge because I’ve decided to write it here as a sort of introduction to the friendship theme instead. I believe that friendship is very important, and good friends can really enrich the quality of our daily lives. Well, this is Shakespeare’s quote:

“Words are easy, like the wind; faithful friends are hard to find.”

I don’t doubt the saying is true. We can all make ‘fairweather’ friends throughout our lives – those who are happy to be with us when the going is good. But when things get tough…? That’s when we find out who our real friends are.

This was my Friendship Quote for Day 1 . . .

. . . and here’s the one for Day 2:

Third Friendship Quote

I really like this quote, too. It’s a reminder that none of us is perfect. We all have our idiosyncracies, inadequacies and flaws. A good friend may well recognise these and accept them as simply being part-and-parcel of the ‘whole’ us.

The rules for the challenge are simple:

  1. Post three different quotes on consecutive days. They can be from any source, including quotes written/created by yourself.  All three quotes can be of a similar theme (as I have chosen Friendship) or can all be completely different/unrelated.
  2. Nominate 3 people for the challenge. I have chosen to nominate 3 different people each day – making a total of 9 – but some people just nominate 3 altogether. It’s up to you.

These are today’s three nominees:

Amanda at Forestwoodfolkart

Snowsomewhere

Bekki at Dartmoor Yarns

*****

Quotes Challenge – Day 1

shutterstock_242725570

I am happy to have once again been nominated to take part in the Quotes Challenge, this time by fellow blogger amommasview over there in Australia. Momma’s posts are always informative and thought-provoking, on topics as varied as health and fitness, kids and homeschooling and environmental issues – plus many more. It was Past Present and Future that Momma chose to do for her Quotes Challenge and for my three quotes I’ve decided to look at the theme of Friends and Friendship – something we all need in our lives.

One of my favourite friendship quotes is believed to come from William Shakespeare in a collection of poems called The Passionate Pilgrim. It isn’t one of the three quotes I’ve picked for the challenge because I’ve decided to write it here as a sort of introduction to the friendship theme instead. I believe that friendship is very important, and good friends can really enrich the quality of our daily lives. Well, this is Shakespeare’s quote:

“Words are easy, like the wind; faithful friends are hard to find.”

I don’t doubt the saying is true. We can all make ‘fairweather’ friends throughout our lives – those who are happy to be with us when the going is good. But when things get tough…? That’s when we find out who our real frends are.

And on that note here is my Friendship Quote for Day One:

Len Wein Quote

The rules are simple:

  1. Post three different quotes on consecutive days. They can be from any source, or your own.  All three quotes can be of a similar theme (as I have chosen Friendship) or can all be completely different/unconnected.
  2. Nominate 3 people for the challenge. I have chosen to nominate 3 different people each day – making a total of 9 – but some people just nominate 3 altogether. It’s up to you.

So these are the first three nominees:

Daniela at My Gorgeous Recipes

Imran Ali at Shake Your Conscience

J.C. Wolfe at The Wolfe’s (Writing) Den

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